Kabuki Strength
Start your search here for content on our site
Search here:
  • All
  • Articles
  • Athlete
  • blog
  • Chris' Training
  • Equipment
  • Events
  • KMS Private Library
  • KMS Public
  • News
  • Podcasts
  • Sports
  • Strength Chat
  • Uncategorized
  • Virtual Athlete Profiles

Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or simply listen to it on this page using the media player above!!The strength and fitness industry has for too long been dominated by overly-tan, annoyingly-loud YouTube celebrities with less than factual content, aka broscience. Tune in to Strength Chat - hosted by a group of Coaches and Athletes with over 60 years of combined experience – as they talk fact, science, and strength with world-renowned strength, conditioning, and rehab professionals.Today's Strength Chat guest is John Fawkes, an up-and-coming evidence based trainer and coach out of San Francisco. John works with athletes and lifters in all populations to help them develop the systems, psychology and game plan they need to get their minds and bodies into peak condition.In this podcast our hosts discuss the importance of properly reading and interpreting research and its application to practical and real-world uses. Research is one of the foundations for pushing our industry (and athletes) forward; and it is the job of the evidence-based coach to effectively apply research to produce real-world results.A great discussion was had, and we hope you enjoy it!...

Ben Pollack is one of this generation’s greatest lifters and geniuses, a physical culture expert, world record holder and US Open powerlifting champion. Know as “PhDeadlift” on social media, Ben is currently wrapping up his PhD and is one of the most educated and insightful competitors to grace the platform. Check out his site at phdeadlift.com.Confession time: I’m a preworkout junkie.  The adrenaline rush from lifting alone is great, but combine that with a boatload of caffeine and every other stimulant under the sun, and even light training days can feel more exciting.  Plus, all that extra energy obviously has a performance-enhancing effect, as well.Or does it?In reality, as fun and useful as stimulants can be for lifting, they can be really detrimental, too — especially if you tend to rely on them too much, or find that you can’t lift well without them.  The problem is compounded by most of the preworkout products on the market, which are loaded not only with caffeine, but also with a bunch of other new-wave stimulating compounds that can enhance both the benefits and drawbacks of more common pick-me-ups like caffeine.Dave Tate has explained why preworkouts don’t work for him, and I strongly suggest you take a look at his thoughts on the matter.  Chris Duffin and Chad Wesley Smith agree.  And I also suggest that, if you’re using lots of stimulants, that you pay careful attention to a few particular areas of your training: Regulating EffortOne of the most important parts of making long-term progress involves learning to regulate your effort when you train.  On some days, or at certain times during a training cycle, you’ll want to push yourself close to your limits, in order to create the necessary stimulus to build strength and muscle.  At other times, you’ll want to train less intensely...

Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or simply listen to it on this page using the media player above!!The strength and fitness industry has for too long been dominated by overly-tan, annoyingly-loud YouTube celebrities with less than factual content, aka broscience. Tune in to Strength Chat - hosted by a group of Coaches and Athletes with over 60 years of combined experience – as they talk fact, science, and strength with world-renowned strength, conditioning, and rehab professionals. If you are planning to attend SWIS 2018, use the following code to save $200 on registration:swis2018-kabukiRegister at www.swis2018.com Those of you professionals in the clinical and strength words are sure to know about SWIS, shorthand for the "Society of Weight-Training Injury Specialists". Our guest today is the man behind SWIS and the annual SWIS Symposium, Dr. Ken Kinakin.Kabuki Strength is no stranger to SWIS, with host Chris Duffin having spoken multiple times at SWIS and will again be presenting this year along with our Director of Coaching and Performance aka The Wizard of Training - Brandon Senn.Tune in to learn more about the mission of SWIS from Dr. Kinakin himself, as well as some sneak peeks of what is going down at this year's symposium.The mission of SWIS is to bring therapeutic professionals and professional weight lifting trainers together. The goal is to create a win-win-win relationship between the doctor/therapist, the trainer, and the client. SWIS is focused on creating a “bridge” for the doctors/therapists and the gym trainers. This allows each profession to do the best work they can.SWIS is dedicated to bringing the top presenters in their fields (Powerlifters, Bodybuilders, Doctors, Therapists, Trainers, Strength Coaches, and Nutritionists) together  to deliver a powerful 2 days filled with the lastest advancements, research, and techniques for everyone interested in weight training and sports medicine to benefit from.If...

Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, or simply listen to it on this page using the media player above!!The strength and fitness industry has for too long been dominated by overly-tan, annoyingly-loud YouTube celebrities with less than factual content, aka broscience. Tune in to Strength Chat - hosted by a group of Coaches and Athletes with over 60 years of combined experience – as they talk fact, science, and strength with world-renowned strength, conditioning, and rehab professionals.Today's guest is a true pioneer and legend in the strength and fitness worlds, and we are honored to have her on Strength Chat. She is the co-founder and leader of a movement that has empowered hundreds of thousands of women around the world reach their health and fitness goals.Molly Galbraith is an extraordinary person, full of compassion and contagious willpower that touches and inspires those around her. She has dedicated her life's work to helping women "discover all the possibilities for their lives and their bodies and providing evidence-based and body-positive tools to help them reach their goals, all while falling in love with themselves and their bodies in the process."Tune in and listen as Molly shares her story with our hosts and discusses Girls Gone Strong's mission and vision for the future.Girls Gone Strong is a global movement empowering women by providing body-positive, evidence-based, sane, and sustainable nutrition, training, and self-care information. Learn more at girlsgonestrong.com and mollygalbraith.com...

Scroll down to see each day's deadlift and follow along.TOTAL RAISED SO FAR: $3136  Staring today, I am going to be deadlifting 880lbs (400kg) every day for 30 days, or as long as I can make it. We are partnering with Alex's Lemonade Stand, a kid's cancer charity that raises money to fund cancer research specifically for children. It was started by a little girl named Alex when she was 4 years old. She raised over 1 million dollars by age 8 when she passed away from a cancer called Neuroblastoma. Why are we doing this, and why am I using my platform and my company’s platform to do this? Because Kabuki Strength's 4th pillar is Charity, and we believe that making the world a better place through strength should involve giving freely and generously of our time, money, attention, resources, and platform. You can read more about our 4 pillars and our company's philosophy here. Rather than simply drawing attention to ourselves, we’ve found that we can use feats of strength like this to create attention and awareness around a specific cause and have a call-to-action that encourages people to support the cause. My ask of you is simple - please donate whatever you can, if you can, and share one of the daily videos on your platform as a way to reach more people with this cause.  Please click the red "Donate Now" links to donate, and you may follow along with each day's videos on this page below.Thank you,Chris DuffinDay 29 Avg. Velocity | .43 m/s View this post on Instagram  ▪️DAY 29▪️ - The two other Chris’ - @chriscathcartheavyweight and @beardedbencher tying the all-time tandem speed record with a .43m/s pull without straps! - We are deadlifting 880lbs (400kg) every day for 30 days to raise money and awareness for children’s cancer. - We...

Ben Pollack is one of this generation’s greatest lifters and geniuses, a physical culture expert, world record holder and US Open powerlifting champion. Know as “PhDeadlift” on social media, Ben is currently wrapping up his PhD and is one of the most educated and insightful competitors to grace the platform. Check out his site at phdeadlift.com. I was lucky enough to get the chance to chat with Chris Duffin about training recently.  It was a great conversation because we both have a similar mental approach to training: if we’re going to make it worthwhile, we need to go into the gym with a very concrete goal in mind.  And the more frequently we do that, the better.  While light days have their place in any sound training program, they’re just not fun.But as Chris pointed out, training doesn’t always have to be fun.  He put it really simply: training is your job.  I love that analogy, because I think it captures the essence of what makes a successful program and a successful lifter.  In the rest of this article, and in the video below, I’ll go into more detail about what that means, and how you can apply it to your own plan. Staying Consistent Consistency is the name of the game when it comes to strength, and just like you can’t skip work because you’re “not feeling it,” you can’t skip training without a good reason, either.  Of course, just like you might take the occasional sick day from work when you have the flu, there are legitimate reasons to pass on the gym.  If you’re sick, injured, or you have a really significant life event that precludes you from following your plan, you’re not going to help yourself by trying somehow to train anyway.But for the most part, you should take steps to...

This piece was written by Kabuki Strength Co-Owner and Chief Engineer Chris Duffin, a world-renowned coach and strength athlete who has had his fair share of hamstring injuries during his long career. Kabuki Strength is an organization devoted to optimizing human performance via innovative equipment, education, and coaching services. Kabuki.MS is a subscription movement library containing hundreds of educational videos like the ones you see below.  While this piece is specifically around hamstring strain recovery the concepts can be applied across a number of similar soft tissue injuries.  Also understand its important to seek a qualified professionals assessment.  As the following content is not intended to be taken as medical advice but more simply as a sample training plan during the recovery process.As a resource here are some provider searches that I can recommend.http://www.rehab2performance.comhttp://www.clinicalathlete.comhttp://movementproviders.comOutside of direct accident nearly all muscle strains or tears can be traced to two issues.  Either training levels were accumulating fatigue at a higher rate than adaptation or recovery, or there were faulty movement patterns.  Typically the first of those two is the reason and referencing Tim Gabbet’s work is often accompanied with weekly increases in volume above 10-15%.  However in my in experience the latter often comes into play when dealing with hamstring issues as this large muscle group is quick to come into play in regards to compensating for other muscles around the hip. STEP 1 – Rest During Acute Phase As we move into the recovery process which usually will begin following the first 3-4 days of more acute inflation following the initial injury it is important to understand these concepts and a few others.Training itself, or moving, is essential in the healing process.  It is not just blood flow but the release of growth factors and reactions at the cellular level.  These are the same...