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October 14, 2015

My Background, I am a Chiropractor and have been in practice for over 26 years I specialize in movement restoration and rehabilitation based on the Neurodevelopmental Model using a variety of Movement Assessment tools that look for Dysfunction. I have been a Martial Artist for 31 years, lots of different styles but primarily Wing Chun Kung Fu. Only in the past few years have I gotten interested in Powerlifting thanks to an introduction to Marty Gallagher from some friends in Kettlebell world.

The importance of the background is to bring to light, that I had a lot of tools at my disposal and a lot of great coaches. But, for some reason there was a disconnect between my 4 worlds: Clinical Practice, Martial Arts, Kettlebells and PowerLifting. Chris at the KMS was able to tie all of that up for me and help me end two years of pain and frustration.

New mesocycle has started off with a bang, sitting at 18 weeks and things are feeling good. Yes I plan my meets out this far ahead of time. I actually plan out my base training as soon as a meet is over. This phase I drop down into the 6, 5, and 4 rep range, it is a transition from a strictly hypertrophy phases to a moderate hypertrophy/ strength phase. The biggest mistake athletes make is not having a good transition bet higher reps to lower reps. It takes time for your body to readjust to heavier weights, especially if you go from 8's to 3's, everything will feel heavy and look sloppy. You have to make small progression from phase to phase in order for you to transfer things the way you have in mind. Keep these things in mind when you are planning your phases out. I start back into SSB squats and I brought in the buffalo bar for a pressing day. Conventional pulls will stay the same and continue to rotate through as I will push these weights more and drop reps before I drop it out and start pulling sumo around 10-12 weeks out. I am also keeping in my close grip day, just moving from touch and go to pause reps. Really excited to push through this phase and start getting into really weights. Here is week 9 training recap:SundayBack and ShouldersMondaySSB Squats- 440lbs 4x64" Block Sumo Pulls- 606lbs 4x6Hatfield Squats- 4x8Leg Curls- 4x12s/sAb Wheel- 4x10TuesdayBack and BicepsWednesdayDuffalo Bar BP- 380lbs x4x6Incline BP- 4x6 275lbsHammer Strength OHP- 4x8s/sCable Flyes- 4x12DB Side Raises- 4x12s/sFace Pulls- 4x10Single Arm Single Arm Raises- 4x 12 ea arms/sBanded Abs- 4x15[wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false" initial_volume="100" disable_keyboard="0"]DcVduxFJe7Y[/wpdevart_youtube]FridayConventional Deads- 545lbslbs 5x42" Deficit SLDL- 5x8Belt Marches- 4x50s/sBelt Squats-...

Give those feet some love | the function of the foot in sports performanceI’m sure people have noticed my shoeless attire in all my lifting video’s this last year.  There is a reason for this and it ties directly to how we both coach and asses the lifts.  No I’m not going to sell you on going shoeless yourself.  Well, at least not all the time, as you may try it for some information gathering or assessment after this.We are known at Kabuki Strength for promoting and teaching breathing and bracing strategies.  What many may not know is that the very next place we go to is the foot.  In nearly every sport we are transfer power from the ground to some other distal area of the body, usually the hand or shoulder.  This makes the foot an integral part of the equation as this is where everything starts.   In fact a properly grounded and rooted foot will control a lot of the muscles upstream on how to fire and work properly.On our website www.Kabuk.MS we cover some pretty advanced and powerful rooting techniques.  But oftentimes peoples feet are lacking in regards to proper function.  This is a simple result of being cooped up in shoes most our life’s, and at that poorly designed shoes.  Unfortunately just walking around in the concrete jungle or around your house without shoes won’t help as it’s the uneven surfaces that really get the foot to open up and function the way it needs to.The foot needs to act much like a hand as it connects to the ground.  The front of the foot needs to reach wide with the toes spreading out.  Oftentimes the pinky toe, all the way along the 5th metatarsal of the foot, is very inactive due to the compressive...

Chris Duffin making progress on his #GRANDGOALS plans with a crazy deadlift workout. He hit 935lb for 3, and then 960lb for 2. Both lifts being huge all-time PRs. Video below[wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false" initial_volume="100" disable_keyboard="0"]_vav1sUziig[/wpdevart_youtube]...

Stan "Rhino" Efferding is the world's strongest bodybuilder, with a 2300lb RAW total in the 275lb weight class. In his wildly popular "Rhino Rhants" series, Stan goes over some thoughts and experiences that he has had and shares them with his large follower base in a very clear, concise, and logical way. [wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false" initial_volume="100" disable_keyboard="0"]LCagbUS0nQ[/wpdevart_youtube]Video Outline:0:00 - The Kooler! 1:42 - The Steel Curtain2:40 - Free Weights vs. Machines3:45 - Recovery: The harder shit is far more effective than the easier shit6:09 - Chris Duffin and Kelly Starrett  "These methods by Dr. Jones, Kelly Starrett, and Chris Duffin are intended to allow your joints to move unimpinged through their full range of motion."7:10 - Active Recovery - the best method to recover from hard training7:40 - "Chris Duffin's Shoulderok is a great example of an active recovery method, and joint strengthening method. It stimulates the muscles through their entire range of motion - flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and circumduction.// Buy ShouldeRök™8:45 - Mark Philippi helps Stan work through his issues10:11 - "I always do more outside the gym than inside the gym"10:35 - "Movement is Key"11:47 - Unlike the heart, the lymphatic system does not have a pump. It relies on muscular contraction and movement to rid the body of toxins and waste materials"...

Taking your recovery to the next step will help take your performance to the next level. For more information check out my website tmnutrition.net for more articles, ebooks, and online training/nutrition plans.

Also check out the Kabuki Strength Store for cutting edge equipment that will help push you to edge of human performance. 

The ability to recover fast from workouts is key to continuing to make gains and grow week to week. Recovery is not only how well you recover day to day, but also you ability to withstand more and more on a week to week basis as you up the intensity, frequency, and volume. Some key factors to aid in recovery are:

•Sleep

•Proper Programming

•Nutrition

•Restoration Protocol

•Ergogenic Aids/Supplements

•Managing Stress

Sleep is extremely important in that it helps your body regulate back to normal functions, it helps reset and bring down stress levels aka cortisol, helps with GH release, and adapt to the training stimulus. 8-10 hours is ideal for an athlete along with 15-20 min power naps throughout the day. You want to keep the naps short in duration as a longer nap will stimulate sleep inertia, which is a period after the nap that impairs performance and alertness.

Researcher Cheri Mah of the Stanford Sleep Disorders Clinic and Research Laboratory has studied the effects of sleep and athletic performance. Mah noted that sleep is a “significant factor in achieving peak athletic performance.” Mah continued that many athletes accumulate a large sleep debt by not obtaining their required nightly sleep, which can have a negative effects on cognitive functioning, mood, and reaction time. Not surprisingly though, Mah’s suggested that the “negative effects can be minimized or eliminated by prioritizing sleep in general and, more specifically, obtaining extra sleep aka naps to reduce one’s sleep debt.” This sleep debt can’t be made up with one good night of sleep it takes weeks to turn it back around.

“After sleep deprivation, plasma cortisol levels were higher the next day by 37% and 45% increase and the onset of the quiescent period of cortisol secretion was delayed by at least 1 hour.” As stated in a study by the Journal of Sleep Research & Sleep Medicine, Vol 20. You put your body through so much stress daily that night time is when you need to relax and reset your cortisol.

A few simple things to improve sleep are blackout curtains which you can get at Walmart, removing all electronics from your room, having a bedtime routine routine, staying away from TV or loud action packed things that will elevate your heart rate, read a book that doesn’t get your mind racing, and a little meditation which is invaluable in and of itself.

Elite fts article 1

Wrapping up week 7 of training and it was brutal which was the plan. From past experiences I know how far i can push things before I need a deload, unfortunately it has taking me a few injuries to figure it out. They were more like a forced deload but when I look back at my training logs I can see the trend of how many weeks before the injury occurred. I typically deload every 5-7 weeks, if all goes well and i plan things out right and take my recovery more seriously I can push 7 weeks which is what i was able to do this time. Sometimes I pick to heavy of weights and need to deload sooner, so its all based on how I feel. There are always a few ways to tell when you need to take a deloadFeeling unmotivated to hit the gym Feeling beat up or moving slow Feeling under the weather Feeling lethargic and muscles feeling heavyIf you start to feel any of these symptoms it is definitely time to deload and if you keep a detailed training log you can better predict these times so that your training plan doesn't get interrupted. This is my last week of this hypertrophy mes0 cycle and I am pretty happy with how things went with both the weights and volume and with how my weight has climbed. As of this morning I am sitting at 252lbs upon waking so I have about 8 more pounds to go that I will be putting on during this next meso cycle.Here is week 7 training recap:MondayDuffalo Bar Squats- 550lbs x6 and x3, 510lbs x4x22" Block Sumo Pulls- 4x5Leg Press- 4x8s/sAb Wheel- 4x10[wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false"...

Discipline equals freedom is something I picked up from Jocko Willink author of Extreme Ownership, but I was taught it during my time in the Marines. I learned that having the discipline to wake up at a certain time everyday regardless of the situation would give me the freedom to do what I want. I accomplish this freedom by having that discipline to wake up and tackle the task I have set forth for the day. I have the discipline to eat all my meals and bring them with me when i travel so that i can still train hard and reach my goals. It is this day to day discipline that has giving me the freedom to own my life and do the things I want to do.I knew I wanted to fully focus on being the best powerlifter I could be, so I knew I had to travel and learn from the best. I could only accomplish this by creating a job that allowed me to travel and still make money. So I started my own online training and nutrition business so that i could always get my food in, travel, sleep and really focus on my goals as a strength athlete. I had to have a ton of discipline to create a business build my name up to the point where I could do this. Granted it took awhile to get to and it had its ups and downs but I had the discipline to stick with it and make it a success. I learned all this through the rigid schedule of the Marines and the discipline it took to be a good Marine. These lessons have molded me into the man I am today and I am extremely thankful for it. Here is a link to...

Week 5 is a wrap and I made a few changes to the exercise selection, as you'll see below. With such a long offseason I have the ability to work on a lot of things but I know I can't fix everything or to think I could fix everything would be very overwhelming and would cause a very sporadic and jumbled program. When you are programming for yourself, you have to pinpoint what you really need to fix. So really take the time to diagnose what needs the most work and just hammer that. Designing a plan to fix everything in one offseason would cause chaos in your training and you'll end up working out for 3-4 hours and in a week you'll be worn out and start dreading the gym. You can't fix everything in one workout or one training cycle.Diet update, as of today I my calories are up to 5000-5500 and one cheat meal a week. My weight is climbing pretty rapidly which is what i am going for this go around. I want to get to my weight and just sit there as long as possible so my body can get use to it and recomp from there. A big mistake I see a lot people make is they gain weight, get that weight and than immediately diet back down without letting their body get use to the new add size so they diet it off faster and will look the same every time. Its all about patience.Here is a recap of this weeks training:[wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false" initial_volume="100" disable_keyboard="0"]-hnFqNOWtOA[/wpdevart_youtube]MondayDuffalo Bar Squats- 4x82" Block Sumo Pulls- 4x6Pause Squats- 4x5Leg Press- 4x8s/sAb Wheel- 4x10WednesdayCG BP- 5x6Tempo CG BP- 4x5, 3secs down, 3secs pause and...