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Scroll down to see each day's deadlift and follow along.TOTAL RAISED SO FAR: $3136  Staring today, I am going to be deadlifting 880lbs (400kg) every day for 30 days, or as long as I can make it. We are partnering with Alex's Lemonade Stand, a kid's cancer charity that raises money to fund cancer research specifically for children. It was started by a little girl named Alex when she was 4 years old. She raised over 1 million dollars by age 8 when she passed away from a cancer called Neuroblastoma. Why are we doing this, and why am I using my platform and my company’s platform to do this? Because Kabuki Strength's 4th pillar is Charity, and we believe that making the world a better place through strength should involve giving freely and generously of our time, money, attention, resources, and platform. You can read more about our 4 pillars and our company's philosophy here. Rather than simply drawing attention to ourselves, we’ve found that we can use feats of strength like this to create attention and awareness around a specific cause and have a call-to-action that encourages people to support the cause. My ask of you is simple - please donate whatever you can, if you can, and share one of the daily videos on your platform as a way to reach more people with this cause.  Please click the red "Donate Now" links to donate, and you may follow along with each day's videos on this page below.Thank you,Chris DuffinDay 29 Avg. Velocity | .43 m/s View this post on Instagram  ▪️DAY 29▪️ - The two other Chris’ - @chriscathcartheavyweight and @beardedbencher tying the all-time tandem speed record with a .43m/s pull without straps! - We are deadlifting 880lbs (400kg) every day for 30 days to raise money and awareness for children’s cancer. - We...

This piece was written by Kabuki Strength Co-Owner and Chief Engineer Chris Duffin, a world-renowned coach and strength athlete who has had his fair share of hamstring injuries during his long career. Kabuki Strength is an organization devoted to optimizing human performance via innovative equipment, education, and coaching services. Kabuki.MS is a subscription movement library containing hundreds of educational videos like the ones you see below.  While this piece is specifically around hamstring strain recovery the concepts can be applied across a number of similar soft tissue injuries.  Also understand its important to seek a qualified professionals assessment.  As the following content is not intended to be taken as medical advice but more simply as a sample training plan during the recovery process.As a resource here are some provider searches that I can recommend.http://www.rehab2performance.comhttp://www.clinicalathlete.comhttp://movementproviders.comOutside of direct accident nearly all muscle strains or tears can be traced to two issues.  Either training levels were accumulating fatigue at a higher rate than adaptation or recovery, or there were faulty movement patterns.  Typically the first of those two is the reason and referencing Tim Gabbet’s work is often accompanied with weekly increases in volume above 10-15%.  However in my in experience the latter often comes into play when dealing with hamstring issues as this large muscle group is quick to come into play in regards to compensating for other muscles around the hip. STEP 1 – Rest During Acute Phase As we move into the recovery process which usually will begin following the first 3-4 days of more acute inflation following the initial injury it is important to understand these concepts and a few others.Training itself, or moving, is essential in the healing process.  It is not just blood flow but the release of growth factors and reactions at the cellular level.  These are the same...

This article was written by Chris Duffin, Co-Owner and Chief Engineer at Kabuki Strength Let’s start by clarifying that this article is nothing more than a summary of my thoughts based on personal observation, coaching, and discussions with clinicians and professors over the years.  It is not summary of research or definitive fact, albeit from an anecdotal aspect I can consistently drive positive change when fine tuning based on the principles in this piece.Over the years I have observed a direct relationship between deep Neck flexors and quality of bracing and output of force production.  This relationship can be affected by a number of variables and isn’t one simple variable.  There is not one cue or position that will increase your force production or improve bracing quality, nor one sign that will let you know there is a potential problem or opportunity in addressing this area.  However, there is a set of overarching principles I have developed that will make it easy to understand and manage.  It may also explain why certain positions work for some people that don’t normally make sense, or some odd cues and even tools that we see are effective.What’s interesting to note is that at the embryotic state the deep neck flexors are attached to the diaphragm.  Digesting that may help explain why issues in this area or the control of the spinal position at the thoracic outlet are tied so deeply to bracing (use of the diaphragm) and neural output.  Many are aware of the ramifications of all the nerve outputs through the thoracic outlet,  but what I’m diving into isn’t major dysfunction but more subtle changes.  The areas that we are going to explore and fine tune to elicit change are around Over Active Deep Neck Flexors, Shoulder Position, Neutrality & Control of spine...

Chris Duffin is a world-renowned strength coach and record-holding powerlifter with over 2 decades of experience in strength sports. His methods are used and taught across the world from weight-rooms to university classrooms. He is the co-founder and CEO of Kabuki Strength, an organization devoted to creating innovative tools, methods, and education for the community. Please note that this article contains material from our subscription-based movement portal - Kabuki.MS - and is being provided to you free-of-charge. If you want to support the production of further content like this, we encourage you to subscribe to KMS. Use coupon code "onemonthfree" to get your first month's subscription for free.Lets start with what this article is not. It is not a top 5 exercises to develop great looking delts with lateral, front, and rear delt raises to develop each of the heads. Don’t worry you will develop some amazing looking delts in the process as that also happens to be the output of strong healthy shoulders.[caption id="attachment_28328" align="alignleft" width="443"] The Author's Shoulders[/caption]It is a piece to help you develop strong, healthy, and powerful shoulders that can deliver tremendous power while reducing risk of injury in such a complex joint. This top 5 is for developing functional strength movements for the shoulders. Yes, I said the dreaded word ‘functional’. But I’m not talking namby-pamby soda can exercises, I’m talking real movements that develop strength while helping improve the operating mechanics of the shoulders. If you’re not familiar with my background or approach I am certainly a coach and athlete interested in real-world results and believe that stronger is better, so you won’t find remedial PT exercises promoted by me. While I am best known as coach and movement specialist these days, I’ve been (or am depending on your outlook) one of the best pure strength athletes...

DONATE HERE on GoFundMe Watch the intro video above for a brief introduction on what this project is all about and why we are doing it. Scroll down to see every 800 pound squat, day-by-day, along with the vertical bar speed of each squat! My name is Chris Duffin and I am the Co-Founder of Kabuki Strength.  This is the #800everyday fundraiser for Special Olympics Oregon.Kabuki Strength is an organization deeply devoted to optimizing human ability + performance via original equipment, research-based education, and world-class coaching.Our mission and vision is to help make the world a better place through strength. We deeply believe that the pursuit of strength - physical, mental, and emotional - is a virtuous and rewarding endeavor to all who undertake it.Cassandra La Madrid, one of our coaches here at Kabuki Strength, volunteers as a powerlifting coach for Special Olympics Oregon and with her leadership, we want to do our part to help this incredible group of athletes and the SO organization.This fundraising campaign and feat of strength is an effort to raise money and awareness for the Special Olympics organization in Oregon, with the end goal of eventually hosting a Special Olympics Powerlifting Fundraising Meet here at Kabuki Strength Lab later this year.I will be squatting at least 800 pounds every day for 30 days, taking a single rest day every week.Please share this page with your friends, share each of the #800everyday videos, and donate to this awesome cause.Thank you,Chris Duffin and Kabuki Strength#800EveryDay is Complete!Daily Analytics (Avg. Velocity, Peak Velocity, Depth) Daily Squat Feed Day 30 - .24m/s Day 29 - .20m/s Day 28 - .18m/sThese last few days is getting really tough on this #800EveryDay Squats For special Olympics fundraiser and awareness. Today was by far the slowest squat to date and in fact I was worried I was gonna black out...

It is not uncommon for athletes to develop restrictive patterns inhibiting hip extension due to postural deficiencies or imbalances.  The output of this may be pain, or just simply a reduction in performance.  In this article we will teach you how to quickly identify if you have these problems as well as how to resolve them in a safe, efficient, and methodical manner.  To accomplish this we will use several videos from our private video movement library - www.kabuki.ms.  There are hundreds more videos and drills all indexed along with guided tutorials on this website as well.  This piece will also highlight what we can accomplish with our multidisciplinary approach.  Our goal is not to be dogmatic to any one particular method, but to get you back training with the best movement possible to increase performance and reduce your injury risk.Our first step is to perform a Hruska Lift test which is a tool from the PRI discipline.  When performing this test it is critical to cue posterior pelvic tilt (a slight crunch pulling the pelvis back) before bracing the core.  It is also just as critical that while performing the test that you don’t relax from this position while you perform the hip extension.If you are unable to reach full extension or have cramping, tightness, pain, or inhibition reaching extension you likely have what is called a PEC (posterior exterior chain) pattern.  You would need to do further testing with the PRI methods to determine which and which underlying pattern is the issue.If you “failed” the Hruska lift test we are now going to diverge from the PRI approach and play with some other methods.  Further testing could be done to determine if the issue is in the left or right hip or what the underlying dysfunctional pattern is. ...

Editor's note - I would recommend listening to Chris' reading of this piece via the voice-over video above. In editing this piece I found myself with my stomach in my throat, especially towards the end when Chris' emotions show in his voice. Having known Chris for a few years and having heard bits and pieces of stories from his childhood, I can say with certainty that him writing this piece was no easy thing. I could tell that Chris struggled processing and sharing some of these experiences. I urge you all to listen open-hearted and take all the good you can from an experience like his. There is no deeper connection in humanity than the empathy and love we can share for one another. [caption id="attachment_13824" align="aligncenter" width="1024"] Me and my younger sisters when we were all older, after I had custody of them and raised them.[/caption]Writing these pieces has been challenging as I’ve had to dig up memories and emotions that had long ago been shoved into a dark, hidden corner of my heart. It’s especially difficult because I have kids now the same age as when some of these stories take place for me or my siblings.  Looking at my kids while at the same time reflecting on what the past held for me taps deep into that emotional bank and often brings me to tears.  I don’t want to see my kids live through anything like that, yet at the same time I would never, EVER, trade my life and experiences for anything else.  With pain, mistakes, and lows also comes highs, joys, glory and has been a huge part in contributing to the beautiful and blessed life I have lived; a life arc that most can’t fathom.  This is pretty much what this writing is about, Heartbeak and...

In the following video I discuss leverages and deadlifting.  A lot of people assume if there is less apparent bar movement that the lifter has some phenomenal leverages allowing them to lift the bar less.  Oftentimes this appearance is a result of refined technique and not leverages.  This is not always the case but simple math of looking at height and the ape index would let you know.  Being that I am both average height with perfectly average ape index, and with refined technique I am a good example to use.  In the video and discussion I review these points and also overlay two videos.   It shows one of those people that wants to blame their poor technique and how much others lift on leverages.  Focusing on excuses instead of their own technique is leaving performance potential on the table for them.  As well as putting them at significant risk for injury.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ByAV1ywDv8 ...