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It is a simple fact that heavy resistance training and even endurance training increases our susceptibility to getting hemorrhoids. If you lift weights, you are in danger of developing hemorrhoids and that risk develops as you age. The age discussion becomes important as today’s athletes and those with active lifestyles are choosing to maintain these activities for a far longer basis, thus increasing your risk. At age fifty about half of us will have hemorrhoids. In addition to age, history of pregnancy and obesity are also primary risk factors. For the purposes of this article, we will skip discussion in regards to obesity as we are talking about athletes.

The textbook definition of hemorrhoids is enlarged veins in the anus. Once enlarged these hemorrhoids may become irritated, or even prolapse and become external hemorrhoids. In addition to pain and irritation hemorrhoids may cause bleeding or display as a bloody stool.

In this two part series, Chris Duffin sits down with Dr. Stuart McGill. Dr. McGill is the leading researcher on Biomechanics in the world. He is a professor of spine biomechanics at the University of Waterloo (Waterloo, ON, Canada). His advice is often sought by governments, corporations, legal experts and elite athletes and teams from around the world. Difficult back cases are regularly referred to him for consultation.In this second piece they discuss where athletes often go wrong in their warmup routines and the impact to their performance. Following their easily incorporated suggestions for improved competition and training prep will increase your performance and reduce your risk of injury. They also delve into the subject of maximizing ‘neural drive’ and how to do so in athletic development....

Welcome to the Kabuki Movement System!Before we get into the specifics of what KMS is, here's what a membership on this site will provide you with:Access to KMS video library containing over 100+ videos (more being added weekly)  Guided tutorials created by KMS coaches, outlining proper movement progression and common programming solutions Discussions and access to KMS coaches (Chris Duffin and Co.) via comments on individual videos or the forum KMS programming outlines and sample programs to help you in creating your own programs  Private video content with some of the most recognizable names in the industry - discussing relevant topics​So then, all that being said...

The Masters of Movement video is here. Even if you missed the sold-out launch of Masters of Movement back in November, the video is finally here! Over twelve hours of never-before-seen powerful content -- from mastering assessments (Somerset) to cracking the "code" on mobility (Weingroff) to creating core "traction control" for unbridled power (Duffin) to mastering olympic lifts for sport performance (Totten) -- is available NOW.Click here to buy...

Who are you and what defines your identity? It is not your past, a sum of your experiences or your environment. YOU define who you are. You have the power to define ‘who you are’ and what you will be in the future.  None of your past experiences define you unless you let them, or want them to.  You can create the vision for who you choose to be in life and then work to become that.  To many people let past experiences or external factors define them. It can be productive and instructive to acknowledge and honestly evaluate your past, but when you let your past define your present and future self,  it puts a shackle around your ankle limiting your potential for growth.  Great men never allow themselves to be limited in this way. Extraordinary things have never resulted from this approach.  Visionaries shape the world we live in and you can be the visionary who shapes your life.I’ve referred to my own past experiences occasionally in recent articles, interviews, or podcast.  But this story has nothing to do with what I’ve chosen to become and who I am today.  Let me repeat that, NOTHING.  I share my story to inspire others, not to wallow in the past.  To me it feels like the story of someone else’s life at this point, almost like fiction, compared to my life today.  My upbringing living in abject poverty did not create me.  We poached animals, put water out in the sun in gallon jugs to shower, and met a lot of unsavory people through the years.  I don’t remember how many winters we spent with a family of 5 living in 16-foot trailer “down by the river.”  We moved every 2 weeks after the forest service questioned us so we appeared to...

“Life Insulation”, volume 1.Whether it be physical or emotional, true strength is a demand. Not a request.If you are asking for it, waiting for it, or even praying for it, you have misjudged its fundamental nature; It is elusive and hard to come by, and won’t politely join by request those without the will to grab it by the throat, and squeeze until it cooperates.Wishing you were strong is like simply wishing you were rich, or wishing you were a super-athlete genius; All the want and wish in the world won’t develop, sharpen, and civilize your mind or break down, build up, and make savage your body. Once you’ve mentally and physically built and insulated yourself with blood, sweat, and resolve, then the once fragile house of cards becomes and stays an anti-fragile house of bricks.There is no one but yourself to look to for lasting strength- and the only question that needs to be considered is “Am I willing to live one day/ week/ month/ year without being physically and mentally stronger and more capable than I was in the previous?”If the answer is yes, then… move along. This is not a place for you. We don’t understand you, and you certainly won’t understand us. Or, stay, with the awareness that until you adjust your mindset and actions you are being judged for condemning yourself to mediocrity* and sitting idle among your unrealized potential. If you’ve decided to stop putting pressure on yourself to progress as a human being, then step to the side so those NOT simply waiting to die can charge through the middle, and set a good example for all those that see them at work.If the answer is no (as it should be), then embrace the mindset of a strong person, and leave the wishy-washy requests...

By: Don Berry, DC CK FMS SFMA  My Background, I am a Chiropractor and have been in practice for over 26 years I specialize in movement restoration and rehabilitation based on the Neurodevelopmental Model using a variety of Movement Assessment tools that look for Dysfunction. I have been a Martial Artist for 31 years, lots of different styles but primarily Wing Chun Kung Fu. Only in the past few years have I gotten interested in Powerlifting thanks to an introduction to Marty Gallagher from some friends in Kettlebell world.The importance of the background is to bring to light, that I had a lot of tools at my disposal and a lot of great coaches. But, for some reason there was a disconnect between my 4 worlds: Clinical Practice, Martial Arts, Kettlebells and PowerLifting. Chris at the DMS was able to tie all of that up for me and help me end two years of pain and frustration. Part 1: My Shoulder Dislocation and Two Years of Frustration to Recovery I had just set a national record in my age weight class for a raw squat for 420 lbs. My shoulder was a little tight so I planned to keep the bench light and murder the Dead Lift. Unfortunately, my shoulder gave out on the bench at 275 lbs., a weight I could rep for sets of 5 in training. That was it for me that day and for a long time to come. At the time of the injury I was in a bit of pain but mostly in shock as to why this had happened. I really didn’t get the answer to that until just a few weeks ago at the Duffin Movement System certification (More on that later).   The only input I did get was from Kirk Karwoski who said, “Your...

Injury Prevention, Wisdom, Longevity - You're Not as Broken as You Think You AreChris Duffin is a dominant force in both raw and multi-ply lifting, He currently held the all-time raw (with wraps) world record with a 881-pound squat at 220-pounds bodyweight. In 2014, he posted a raw total of 2061 pounds in the 220-pound class. In addition to his own competitive success, he has been the owner and coach of Kabuki Strength in Portland, Oregon since 2008. Chris Duffin holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from The Oregon Institute of Technology and an MBA from The University of Phoenix. Duffin approaches powerlifting at a level of technical efficiency that is unsurpassed. His insight into training has helped many of his students go on to success beyond their expectations.My wife is convinced that it is my goal to break something when I go extreme rock crawling and off-roading. While she isn’t right, she isn’t entirely wrong.A big piece of the rock crawling/off-roading sport for me is trying to anticipate every failure point and then find a way to make it unbreakable. The goal is to make it out unscathed, but you never find out if you succeeded or what you overlooked unless you push past the limits. Training isn’t much different. The exception is that you try to stay within the limits or you risk actually breaking your body. It is the same that we try to anticipate failure points and build an unbreakable machine of a body.You constantly analyze your body’s strengths, weaknesses, imbalances, and technical flaws, then develop a strategic game plan to address them. This plan is tested at a meet or in the gym testing a new PR. Good lifters gather more information from these testing experiences and go back to the drawing board to begin anew and...

Originally posted on EliteFTSFear is a powerful human response, as it should be. It is our primal risk management tool that controls actions and even the nervous and hormone systems to keep us safe. Although fear is a risk management tool that keeps us safe, it can also hold us back from challenges, opportunities, and the success had from overcoming those.You can only realize your full potential when you take risk and push yourself to your limits. There are differences in risk tolerance and ability to overcome fear between people. This difference, and one's individual tolerance level for risk, is one of the defining things that have separated the great leaders and visionaries in history from...

Originally posted on EliteFTS.comMastery of skills, or practical knowledge, is of critical importance in the self-identity of man and, indeed, is a cornerstone of civilization. The mastery of skills allows us to create, innovate and achieve in our rapidly changing society. The creation of both tools and objects of art is one of the differentiating factors between humans and animals. Sure, there are some animals that create limited tools or works of art, but there is a clear difference in the human scope of creation. For example, in nature, specific ‘tasks’ may be passed down or the ‘art’ that the rare animal may create is biologically driven and usually just a display for the mating process. The art and tools produced by man are far more diverse and complex than anything you will find in the animal kingdom, owing to man’s rational thought and individual choice.Mastery of a skill first requires both humility and confidence. Confidence certainly fits the generally accepted mold of the alpha male, as it should. Without confidence, we can never start the process of skill mastery and we certainly can't hope to complete it. The question is, where and how does humility fit into this process? Without both confidence and humility, one’s ability to learn, grow and create will be severely limited. Each of these traits must be carefully balanced to maximize one’s ability to learn and contribute. Confidence will get you moving because you believe in yourself and your capabilities. This starts you on the path to a new skill. But once you jump in, you must temper that confidence and accept being humble in order to learn and master that skill. You can see this not only in the elite level of sports athletes and coaching but in nearly any other field that requires...