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Chris Cathcart is a teen powerlifting competitor, Virtual Coaching client, and member/contributor at Kabuki Strength Lab. For every change you see in my body, my mind has gone through ten. When I began the journey that I am on in 2015, I was in one of the worst places I ever been. I was 330 pounds, thirteen years old and had just experienced loss for the first time. My first dog had died and I was trying to make sense of the world. I knew things and people died, I had seen things die, I had killed things before, I had never felt the ache of missing that comes with the loss of someone or something near to your heart.The first time I experienced loss it came with a warning. This will be you, and if you change nothing, that will be sooner than you can imagine. My first dog died of disease related to obesity, something that my entire family, human and pet alike was all too familiar with. This comes to my first point. Set Grand Goals. I didn’t know it at the time but I was setting for myself the ultimate Grand Goal. Become better. I didn’t know where to go from that goal, but I had a why and a what, so the how would only follow naturally.Starting out I tried walking once a day for a quarter mile, eating more fiber, and drinking water (like at all). This alone helped me lose 10 lbs due to the horrible condition my body was in. This brings me to my second point, which is that Grand Goals are important, but I think after you set them you should focus on One Degree of Change at a time. If I had set out for myself a workout regiment and...

 Strength is a science. Rehabilitation from Low Back Injury is a Science. Yet when it comes to low back rehabilitation the health professions (Physical Therapy, Chiropractic and others) seem to turn to anti-science principles and embrace faith based systems.It’s time for the tide to turn. The science that is unnegotiable in medical methodology, is the same science that is unnegotiable in successful rehabilitation. I teach rehabilitation based in the science principles of anatomy, physiology, hypothesis creation and hypothesis testing. The same principles that underlie strength coaching.The further proof of the failure of ‘modern’ machine based spinal rehabilitation methods came walking through my door recently. A person had made an appointment to see me, he had been doing Keiser training to “strengthen his low back” 2-3 times per week for the last 3 years. 4 weeks before seeing me he had gone to his Keiser Training Centre and got strapped into a lumbar extension machine and as it flexed him forward he felt a “pop” and immediate pain.An MRI taken a few days later showed what had been postulated could happen using this equipment, did in fact occur. He had blown a disc using the very equipment he believed was supposed to be helping him.Here is his MRI. I’ve circled the huge disc injury that resulted from being flexed by equipment.Now the mechanism of this type of disc injury has been demonstrated by Professor Stuart McGill (Callaghan and McGill. See comment in PubMed Commons belowClin Biomech (Bristol, Avon). 2001 Jan;16(1):28-37) in his lab.This study showed that a disc only has a certain amount of flexion tolerance under load. The greater the load the less the tolerance to repetitive flexion. When you combine Wilke’s disc pressure study, where the disc pressure has been measured to be more than double when sitting flexed...

What started out as a small group of powerlifters training in a garage soon became a full-blown training facility in inner-city Portland. What started out as a difficult childhood in the high desert of Central Oregon soon became a man with vision to change the world and inspire thousands to live better through strength. What started out as a successful college football coach and one of the nation's most successful and decorated homebuilders soon became a world champion masters lifter with a heart for helping others.The "What" and the "How" of a company are fairly easy to discern; the "Why" however, is another story. We want this short essay to serve as a communique to our community; a writing from the heart of Kabuki Strength's leaders and staff that defines our "Why". You might be wondering...

This piece was written by Mark Langley on his blog. TL;DR -The purpose of this article is to address the validty and reliability of velocity based training (VBT) measurement devices.-Three devices were compared to video analysis: Beast, PUSH, and OpenBarbell V2. Of the three, OpenBarbell seems the most appropriate for powerlifting.- “This will be covered largely from a powerlifting standpoint. Also, did I mention this is geared towards powerlifters? I mostly wrote this for people interested in improving their squat, bench press, and deadlift. Athletes that focus on these movements in particular are powerlifters. I wrote this for powerlifters. Powerlifting.”-The most important considerations for a VBT device for powerlifters are affordability, reliability at low-end velocity, and support for powerlifting specific movements (primary and secondary lifts)-There is nothing that makes a tethered or accelerometer VBT device better than other options without testing across different movements you intend to perform under VBT conditions-The limitation of an analysis like this is accuracy or reliability can be improved in some models with no additional hardware changes (adding something to the internals). An update to their respective apps could change how velocity is calculated, rendering this analysis null and void. This was conduct in late January of 2017 INTRODUCTION Velocity Based Training (VBT) is one method of auto-regulating training. It can auto-regulate load on the bar, number of reps within a set, total number of sets, any combination of those three, or any other relevant factor in training. It is beyond the scope of this article to make the case for VBT. It’s hard to make a case for VBT when you haven’t first established that the methods used to gauge velocity are valid and/or accurate. VBT has been a training methodology put forth in power athletes and team sports. It has gotten significantly less attention for strength athletes...

The year 2016 has been a monumental year for strength sports, with some previously "unbreakable" barriers being broken and incredible athletes pushing the boundary of what we thought to be humanly possible. Here is a compilation of what the editors at Kabuki Strength think are the  greatest feats of strength from this year (so far). We hope you enjoy! (note that these are in no particular order) Bonica Lough squats 600lbs in sleevesThe ladies performance in powerlifting and strength sports the last few years has been incredible, to say the least. This squat by Bonica Lough is the heaviest raw (in sleeves) squat of all-time, and the only 600+ pound raw squat for women, ever. An incredible display of strength by an incredible athlete.Yuri Belkin deadlifts 921lbs (418kg) beltless @223lbsCementing himself as one of the greatest deadlifters in history, Yuri narrowly missed the 220lb weight class when he pulled 921lbs in Russia...