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I’m tired of hearing several times a week from people I know, or come across, the “too” word when it comes to exercise!I’m sure you hear it as well from your co-workers, neighbors, parents or grandparents. “I’m too old to lift weights, or my knees are too sore to walk, run, ski or fill in the ______. It pains me to hear folks say “I’m in too much pain to do this or do that. Too heavy, too weak, too busy…blah, blah, blah.Hey if your feeling pain, at least you’re alive! But who wants to live that way?Obesity, back pain, hip and shoulder issues have reached epidemic proportions in today’s America. Americans, simply put have become a nation of overweight and out of shape organisms living in pain and agony with a ticking time bomb behind their breast pocket ready to blow at the event of a sudden exertion.Am I calling out everyone? Of course not! There are still plenty of folks who care about their health and welfare. However, the ranks of non-movers grows greater every year and it’s not just the aging Baby Boomers - but Gen X, Gen Y and Millennials as well. As a nation we have become lazy, overweight and lethargic. We may have developed the strongest thumbs in the world from texting and operating TV remotes, but our fight or flight mechanisms are markedly diminished.Tomorrow I will happily celebrate my 69th birthday. I say happily because even at this age I remain relatively healthy, focused and motivated to compete at the highest levels of my sport: powerlifting. Even after undergoing two shoulder replacement surgeries to rid my glenohumeral joints of osteoarthritis, I continue my passion of lifting heavy weights along with my training partners at the Kabuki Strength Lab. Most of my training partners...

It has now been 12 and eighteen months respectively since I had hemicap surgery on my left and right shoulders. Performed by Dr. Anthony Miniaci at the Cleveland Clinic the shoulder surgeries have performed better than I had hoped. In reviewing the introductory article I wrote in June of 2016 my goal then was to rehab the right shoulder ahead of the October surgery on the left and to get back on the platform by the spring of 2017. I can report now that the second surgery was equally successful as was the follow up rehab work led by PT’s Jim Cavin (right) and Jason Vila (left) at North Lake Physical therapy who pushed me to the limit. It was a long frustrating road as I wanted the pain to subside sooner than it did. However, by using our Duffalo and Transformer Bars, I was able to train the squat well ahead of regaining the shoulder range of motion necessary to get my myself under a straight bar and the Duffalo bar allowed me to start benching sooner than expected. The proprietary bends in the Duffalo Bar force the shoulders into a more centrated position and enabled me to initially bench to a 3 board without pain which I slowly worked it down to my chest over a two month period. Not only did I achieve my goal of competing by the spring of 2017 but at the USPA Masters Cup  in Houston in May I set a new WR in the squat and total and I was just 11 pounds short of the Bench WR-just 7 months after my second surgery!I have been utilizing the ShouldeRok this past summer which has continued to open up my shoulder ROM. Under the watchful eye of our in house chiropractor, Franchesca Vermillion,...

Surgery was exactly four weeks ago and after spending the first three weeks in a right-arm (sling which severely hampers the ability to type) I have been released to begin rehab work. In addition to the resurfacing procedure of the joint, the surgeon repaired my bicep tendon which had become frayed by the interaction with the raw bone. The first few sessions consisted of the therapist performing passive circumduction. We quickly moved to pendulum swings and then pulley work to extend range of motion frontal and then abduction. Because of the nature of the surgery and the need to cut through the infraspinatus to get to the joint, I will be restricted to just 20 degrees of external rotation for another three weeks. However, I can already tell that the severe pain from the osteoarthritis in the shoulder is gone and that this was absolutely the right decision. It will allow me to get back to full competition after rehab.In my third PT session, I took a Boomstick in to demonstrate its benefits to my therapist. The sight of the Sports Medicine Oregon PT on the table and the patient administering to him quickly got the attention of the whole room and provided some good natured ribbing but also genuine interest in this popular tempering tool. When I left the session, I was short one Boomstick which was acquired by the clinic and will be incorporated into their arsenal.My goal is to complete rehab this summer to allow some bench training prior to returning to the Cleveland Clinic in late October to have the same surgery on the left shoulder giving me time to rehab that one in time to get back on the platform by the second quarter of 2017.To read more about the hemicap surgery take a look...

As Co-owner of Kabuki Strength and The Lab, Rudy is an active competitive powerlifter. Since beginning his powerlifting career twelve years ago at age 55 he has set 25 American and 24 World records. He has been referred to by his business partner at Kabuki Strength, Chris Duffin , as ”the strongest 60+ year old drug-free powerlifter in the world”. At KSL, Rudy actively mentors and coaches members on goal-setting, mental preparation and powerlifting technique. In addition, Rudy serves as the Oregon State Chairperson for the American Powerlifting Association and is the meet director for the upcoming WPA World Championships in October.  About Fifteen years ago when I was then older than most of you readers are today, my doctor gave me three keys to a long and healthy life:Pick your parents Take a baby aspirin every day Exercise every day that ends in “y”If you’re reading this then you can eliminate directive number as no one gets to select the DNA they are born with. Obviously, your chromosomal makeup plays a vital role in who you are physically and mentally. Your genes determine your eye and hair color, your body type, height, I.Q. blood type, susceptibility or resistance to certain ailments or diseases and thousands of other features that make you unique. You may have “good genes” that bless you with good health or you may have inherited a body type that is less than athletic or an immune system that is not as robust as the average person.However, you can control your what you do with the body and mind that was given to you at birth. At age 67, I have tried to adhere to items two and three above. If you are a male over 50 or a female over 60, being on an 81mg daily aspirin regimen may...

As rehab from hemicap surgery continues, I want to give a shout out to PT, Jim Cavin, LMT, Jim Freda and my long time training partner, John Hare for their programming, encouragement and "hands on" work to get the shoulder to a point of getting under the bar again. My initial bench work was with the Bandbell Bamboo bar with light suspended plates and high reps (3x50). In this video, we are using the Thompson Fat Pad for better shoulder support and the Duffalo Bar by #KabukiStrength for better shoulder joint centration. With the bar loaded to 147 lbs. we are using a two board to reduce the extended range of motion normally afforded by the Duffalo Bar. The goal is to take the Duffalo Bar to the chest as my ROM improves. The proprietary bends in the Duffalo Bar took away all the shoulder pain that I experienced just three days prior benching with a straight bar loaded to just 105lbs. At Kabuki Strength we encourage the use of the Duffalo Bar as a primary training bar for squatting and benching to reduce the strain on the shoulder. As you can see here it is also an excellent shoulder rehab tool.#donniethompsonVideo: ...

Rudy Kadlub (the writer) is Co-Owner and CEO of Kabuki Strength and is an active competitive powerlifter. Since beginning his powerlifting career twelve years ago at age 55 he has set 25 American and 24 World records.Jacob Lonowski is currently the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for Olympic Sports at Georgia State University where he trains Softball, Baseball and Women’s Track & Field. While playing football at Georgia Tech he earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Management with a Specialization in Information Technology Management and then his Master’s of Science from Georgia State University in Exercise Science with a Specialization in Exercise Physiology. Also, he is certified by the NSCA as a CSCS and by the CSCCa as a SCCC. It is best to reach him through email at [email protected], he always very eager to learn & share. Business partner Chris Duffin, and I recently attended the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches annual convention in Fort Worth, Texas and while there we had a chance to meet several coaches from around the country and demonstrate the features and benefits of some of our patented products. As a former collegiate offensive line coach myself, it occurred to me while talking to Georgia State Strength Coach Jacob Lonowski, an offensive line alum of Georgia Tech, that the unique properties of the Duffalo Bar produced by our company, Kabuki Strength, can have specific practical benefits in the strength training for offensive linemen in football. The Duffalo Bar's proprietary bend allows for improved positioning of the shoulder joint in the glenoid (socket), increasing power transfer through the joint and reducing the risk of injury that comes with handling huge loads with sub-optimal joint positioning. In addition to this improved joint centration and the cued scapular retraction & depression (a more stable and safe position for...

After eleven years as a competitive powerlifter (24 World and 25 American titles) my shoulder joints have been reduced to bone on bone. Osteoarthritis is defined as the wearing away of the cartilage which cushions the joint. Most people over 60 years of age with this condition are subjected to shoulder replacement surgery which is an invasive procedure involving the removal of the head of the humerus and the installation of a titanium rod with a titanium ball on top into the bone marrow of the humerus itself. I was told a number of years ago by my orthopedic surgeon that I would not be able to lift heavy ever again if I undertook such an operation. Therefore, I continued to train with severe pain rather than end my career. My training partner, John Hare, has literally had to shove me under the bar for the last four years in order to get into position to squat-a very painful movement. I continued to ask my surgeon if any new techniques had been developed for the shoulder like the resurfacing procedures being performed on hips and knees. Finally, last year he referred me to Dr. Anthony Miniaci at the Cleveland Clinic who has been successfully resurfacing shoulders with a partial replacement technique known as Hemicap surgery. In this less invasive procedure the head of the humerus will be smoothed down to accept an “igloo”-like titanium dome which is merely glued and screwed to the surface. On the glenoid process of the scapula he inlays Teflon to form the other side of the joint. After meeting with Dr. Miniaci in March, I was convinced that after rehab I would be able to continue to compete at a high level. I’m on my way to Cleveland as I write this for surgery tomorrow on...

After reviewing the x-ray of my shoulder which I had hurt on the ski hill a few weeks earlier, my doctor said to me in his office “there’s nothing structurally wrong with it, just a little bursitis. You’re just getting old”. I was 54 at the time and my first thought was: “Screw you! I refuse to accept that I cannot continue to lead an active lifestyle”. Hell, except for a nagging pain in the shoulder that wouldn’t go away, I still skied and water-skied and felt like I did 10 years earlier. I was not going to sit on the couch and become a spectator and wither away. That doctor’s words resonated with me and motivated me. I refused to believe I was getting “old”, in fact, at that moment I banned the word from my vocabulary and proclaimed myself a “mature athlete”. I immediately embarked on a mission to rehab my shoulder and to get into the weight room to get strong and fit.

If you, too, were born between 1946 and 1962 (the Baby Boomers) you are part of America’s largest and most productive generation ever. Our generation has had the advantage of living during an age in which we have seen the greatest advances in science and medicine in the history of mankind. We will live longer than all previous generations. We say that 50 is the new 40 and 60 is the new 50.

power of thought

April 2, 2015 Strength Training, Training Tags: Rudy Kadlub; Mature; Masters; Visualization; 0 Comments

Rudy Kadlub, 65, co-owns Elite Performance Center in Portland, OR with business partner, Chris Duffin. It’s important that you get a sense for who he is before you put merit into his content (and you should). An American and World Record power lifter in three age divisions (22 World and 23 American/National records in four federations over a 10 year Masters career), Rudy is a former college football coach (UC Davis, University of Northern Colorado, and Boise State). He holds a master’s degree in Psychological Kinesiology from UNC where he also did his doctoral work in Sports Psychology. He’s also currently the strongest drug free 60+ Powerlifter in the world!