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Travis Jewett is a strength coach and chiropractor with a clinic in Cherokee, IA. He is a member of the MobilityWOD staff and teaches seminars and workshops around the world in strength training and human performance. He is also a member of the Kabuki Strength Advisory Board. He works with people of all ages to improve their quality of life through strength and movement. If you have not read the first part, click here to get caught up.Part two is going to start laying down a theoretical framework for why anything is effective at all when helping someone come back from an injury. If you are at all involved in the world of training and/or rehabilitation, you are well aware there are a million ways to spend your money on some kind of device or tool. You will also notice there are a million more ways to work on how you move and even more people you can make an appointment with to work you over and tell you all sorts of things about your current situation (only some of which is likely to be true).What are you supposed to do when you are met with all these options? If you are someone experiencing pain (and even worse if the pain is severe), you are desperately seeking the advice of anyone who can help you experience less pain. This appears to be a reasonable idea. We don’t like to experience pain. It isn’t fun. It can interfere greatly with your everyday life, activities, work, and relationships. Who you decide to seek advice from will also dramatically effect the outcome and your entire future predictions about similar situations and your ability to do or not do things the rest of your life. This is not hyperbole. My apologies if I am scaring...

Travis Jewett is a strength coach and chiropractor with a clinic in Cherokee, IA. He is a member of the MobilityWOD staff and teaches seminars and workshops around the world in strength training and human performance. He is also a member of the Kabuki Strength Advisory Board. He works with people of all ages to improve their quality of life through strength and movement. I recently saw an exchange on Twitter between two professionals in the rehabilitation world. The original tweet mentioned a patient who had started deadlifting because they had a herniated lumbar disc. The first response was from a different professional questioning this course of action. He said something along the lines of, “Hmmmm, was this when he was symptomatic or asymptomatic?” To put this in more context, the person who posted the original tweet is not the person who started the deadlift program. The original person thought it was great this patient had decided to take action into his own hands instead of falling victim to the system. The second person was questioning whether a person with a herniated disc should be deadlifting. I hope you are not confused, because we are going to dive deep into the rabbit hole.I am in the business of helping people who are currently experiencing pain or injury get back to doing the things they need to do and want to do. I have to be able and willing to listen to what a person is telling me and help them work through the possible reasons they have come into my clinic with their current issue. Periodically I get a person who comes to me simply because they want to know if there is anything they can be doing in their training or to take a look at how they move during...

Travis Jewett is a strength coach and chiropractor with a clinic in Cherokee, IA. He is a member of the MobilityWOD staff and teaches seminars and workshops around the world in strength training and human performance. He is also a member of the Kabuki Strength Advisory Board. He works with people of all ages to improve their quality of life through strength and movement. How specific do you need to be when training for a powerlifting meet? I really want you to stop and think about this question. You may have heard a lot of people who are popular in the world of powerlifting describe how important it is to be as specific as possible when training for the sport. You have to use a straight bar all the time to create the specific stress needed to drive adaptation. Many of the people I hear talk in these kinds of absolutes also complain about their elbow or shoulder or adductor or some other body part hurting going into a meet. What is really paramount in training is the application and management of stress. I am going to argue the specificity of the implement used is not as important as people think.I hate to break it to you, but powerlifting is a fairly non-athletic endeavor. Louie Simmons used to say it was the sport for the rest of us. This means most people fall into the trap of exclusively training in a sagittal plane with a barbell and never really deviate. What ends up happening over time is you develop training related aches, pains, and injuries due to excessive training in certain planes and patterns. You can look at acute and chronic workload articles (some have been written on this site) and loading different force vectors (again, this has been written before...

This article was written by Travis Jewett, a contributor to Kabuki Strength Call it whatever you like. Flossing, voodoo wrapping, compressing, blood flow restriction; you name it. There are a lot of terms floating around that describe a similar activity. We have gotten to a point where you can find compression bands just about anywhere. There is a reason it’s becoming more popular, it works. What most people don’t realize is there are a lot of different ways to use deep compression and a lot of different reasons someone may do it in certain situations. Improving Lymphatic Drainage & Reducing Swelling The idea of deep compression has been around for a very long time. The first time I heard about using this kind of compression was from Dick Hartzell and a book titled, Don’t Ice that Ankle Sprain. In the book, Dick goes into detail about leaving that ice bag in the trash and applying super compression to the ankle to stabilize and flush swelling. The super compression also can be analgesic (acting to relieve pain), allowing the clinician or athlete to apply traction and motion to the joint so you can begin to move the joint within tolerance and realign any of the bones of the ankle. He was one of the first people to say icing is not that important when it comes to working with a joint injury (which has since been confirmed through scientific studies; icing doesn’t do any damage if you do it but it also doesn’t supply any appreciable benefit) and that the important things are the compression and motion. Your body does not drain lymphatics passively. Getting rid of swelling is an active process. Joint Distraction Another point I want to emphasize about the concepts Dick presents is the idea of super levels of stability and joint distraction...

Many times I forget to mention I am also a clinician. I run a chiropractic clinic in Northwest Iowa and work with a wide range of people. One of my favorite things to work with is the shoulder. In this video I am explaining some of the work I do with the Boomstick, a big steel pipe specifically designed and calibrated for these purposes. This is a person who has been told by an orthopedic surgeon they have a labrum tear and adhesive capsulitis verified by an MRI...