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What is the oblique sling, and how does it affect me as an athlete? Are you a baseball player and want to throw harder and hit the ball further? Or are you a volleyball player that wants to increase arm speed and hit harder? Or are you a quarterback that wants to throw with a little more mustard? Your ability to do so is dependent upon your ability to load and create length through your oblique sling. This sling is our bodies personal whip. Understanding how to use it is a insanely effective way to improve sport performance.What Is The Oblique Sling Your oblique sling is a line of musculature that runs from your shoulder to the contralateral side of your pelvis. In other words, right shoulder to left hip and left shoulder to right hip. This line of musculature is what rotates our pelvis into side lying. As mentioned, it is our bodies own personal whip. When looking at your torso, your oblique sling begins just above the hip at the external oblique, moves to the rectus abdominus, to the internal oblique, to the serratus, and into the pec on the opposite side.  Picturing this line of muscle anatomically allows you to see its importance in generating rotation. It plays a huge role in all rotational sports. As a strength coach that works with mainly overhead and rotational athletes, this is an important concept to understand and continue to find new ways to address and fine tune.Role Of The Oblique Sling In Throwing Your oblique sling plays a massive role in the stretch reflex of throwing. Briefly, the stretch reflex is also known as the stretch shortening cycle. The stretch reflex involves eccentric lengthening of the muscles involved in the movement, which stores elastic energy, allowing us to generate power. An Eccentric...

Rudy Kadlub (the writer) is co-owner of Kabuki Stength and is an active competitive powerlifter. Since beginning his powerlifting career twelve years ago at age 55 he has set 25 American and 24 World records. Jacob Lonowski is currently the Head Strength & Conditioning Coach for Olympic Sports at Georgia State University where he trains Softball, Baseball and Women’s Track & Field. While playing football at Georgia Tech he earned his Bachelor of Science in Business Management with a Specialization in Information Technology Management and then his Master’s of Science from Georgia State University in Exercise Science with a Specialization in Exercise Physiology. Also, he is certified by the NSCA as a CSCS and by the CSCCa as a SCCC. It is best to reach him through email at [email protected], he always very eager to learn & share.Business partner Chris Duffin, and I recently attended the Collegiate Strength and Conditioning Coaches annual convention in Fort Worth, Texas and while there we had a chance to meet several coaches from around the country and demonstrate the features and benefits of some of our patented products. As a former collegiate offensive line coach myself, it occurred to me while talking to Georgia State Strength Coach Jacob Lonowski, an offensive line alum of Georgia Tech, that the unique properties of the Duffalo Bar produced by our company, Kabuki Strength, can have specific practical benefits in the strength training for offensive linemen in football.The Duffalo Bar's proprietary bend allows for improved positioning of the shoulder joint in the glenoid (socket), increasing power transfer through the joint and reducing the risk of injury that comes with handling huge loads with sub-optimal joint positioning. In addition to this improved joint centration and the cued scapular retraction & depression (a more stable and safe position for pressing) provided...