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Chris Duffin

Known as the “Mad Scientist Strength” Chris is an Ex Corporate Executive turned Inventor and Movement professional. He has positioned himself uniquely in the fitness world bridging the gap between (and working with both) the top clinical rehab and sports professionals in the world and the in the trenches athletes and S&C coaches. He promotes and uses evidence-based approaches in developing his coaching and cueing methodologies and strength training equipment. Chris keeps it simple with reinforcing clean natural movement patterns and then focusing on building strength. 

He is the only person in the world today squatting and deadlifting over 900lbs at his bodyweight and is one of the best Powerlifters of our age, and one of the most respected strength coaches in the industry. Chris’s professional background prior to his current roles includes 18 years of diverse operations management experience in running aerospace, automotive, and hi-tech companies or divisions, utilizing his BS in Engineering and MBA. Chris also co-owns the Kabuki Strength Lab in Portland Oregon and is CEO/Co-Founder of Kabuki Strength Equipment providing innovative equipment and methodologies to the S&C field.

Kabuki Strength Lab

Chris’ Training Logs

 I have recently decided to exit my career of 18 years advancing from engineering to executive level leadership the last 8 years.  This move has been in the works a long time but its taken a lot of work to be prepared for the transition. It is a scary move leaving the comfort of a career I have excelled at and am known for my success. However I’ve reached a point in my life that I need to follow my passion and my dreams full time. I now have the opportunity to spend more time collaborating, learning, distilling, and sharing that knowledge.My goal is to add value while continuously improving my relationship with the Strength and Conditioning Community by providing proprietary tools and knowledge designed to optimize physical and psychological human potential.I am excited about that and making this change is worthy of an epic party to celebrate.Of course my idea of a party is different than what most people would imagine. So before engaging in beer, booze, and food I’m going to push myself to my physical and mental limits while attempting to set records.I’m going to be doing a 500lb squat for reps challenge. If I hit 19 reps in 60 seconds it will break the Guinness World record for best squat in a minute. If I hit 24 reps it beats an unlisted record form the 80’s when Tom Platz and Fred Hatfield went head to head for reps with 500lbs.This will be done walked out and with only knee sleeves and belt.Here is the link and embedded page for the live stream event!!! Please share this post around!May 6th @ 3:30 pm PST https://youtu.be/uONcEvbIwfI  https://youtu.be/uONcEvbIwfIIn the interim here is a video to get you pumped up about the event.https://youtu.be/yZIq1tFIKUg...

I had big goals going into the meet this last weekend. I was feeling really good for retaking the 220 squat record and making a run and bumping up the total record significantly. My weight was the lowest it had been in years going into the meet so I wasn’t worried about the weight cut and new I would be in better shape than I was used to.However I was also pumped about helping my partner at EPC pull off a 97 person meet in record time. I pride myself in well run meets and was also looking to step up the ‘stage presence’ for our lifters. The week was busy and stressful at work and I took all my deload days and then some working late at the gym prepping for the meet. Building a steel framed 16x14 platform, automating my monolift, setting up software to manage the timing.Thursday night I picked up Amit Sapir from the airport who had talked me into letting him do the meet despite not being fully prepped. I took Amit with me on Friday after weigh ins as I ran around town all day doing prep errands for the meet and listening to him say, “what are you doing! Your supposed to be relaxing!”.I ended up passing out on the carpet in my sons room that evening and then waking up later and staying up till past midnight finalizing the flights and meet, results sheet, and meet software. Then instead of sleeping in I was up early running to the meet to finalize a bunch of prep and help train the table help. I tried to get a nap on the floor of my office but didn’t fall asleep but after the rest was feeling refreshed. It wasn’t till warm-ups I realized just...

This weekend I had the opportunity to spend a couple full days working with Ed Coan.  We had a great deal of success in working through some issues he has and establishing a path forward.  During the time we also had a lot of back and forth knowledge sharing.It was a tremendous honor for me to host Ed for the weekend at EPC in Portland and to have his trust for seeking me out.  At the end of the period we filmed an incredible interview covering a number of great topics that I think are worth the watch. Make sure to check out the ShouldeRök™ Ed mentioned and subscribe to our newsletter for weekly insights....

If you get a chance to checkout the new EliteFTS website do so. I post detailed training log's with Dave Tate and EliteFTS. The other featured athletes I have the opportunity to share this with are phenomenal, world class and strong. Take a look around, engage EliteFTS and the community we serve. Join in and take part to increase the amount of good information we share (via tweets, reposts, links etc...

This post isn't just about the rehab process.  It also gives you a view into the mindset that it takes to never give up and not only overcome a major setup back.  And to do so coming  back stronger and more motivated than before.In October of 2010 I tore BOTH the Sternal and Clavicular head of my left pec off their attachment to the humerus.  This required surgery and installation of 3 titanium studs followed by rehab. Since that time I have continued to receive multiple emails, Facebook messages, and YouTube questions due to my rapid recovery prompting me to put this piece together. The typical recovery takes 12 months before getting a full release to train heavy, along with the caveat that you will never be 100% again. In the process I’m sharing with you here I had regained mobility within a matter of weeks and had progressed enough that I was training to compete at a powerlifting meet at 6 months. At 9 months I was in competition setting not only a personal record for a total but also landing a Top10 All-Time Powerlifting total. Given the standard rehab process and the experiences of other lifters this was a significant achievement.The primary content of this article is the video series itself. It is important to note that there is significant risk of re-injury if you pursue these aggressive methods without the proper knowledge or supervision. If you choose to take that risk you can significantly reduce your overall recovery time, yield greater long term recovery, and develop a cascade of other injury due to overcompensation patterns.With my current knowledge and resources I would take a little bit different approach in regards to the specific details of my recovery. However the overall process would still center on the same...

By Chris DuffinIf you watch my weekly video’s you have likely seen my hanging by one hand from a pull-up bar and asked “why”.  Its' not because I'm hoping someone will toss a banana at me, although with my current diet I would probably be quiet happy about that.  As with most things I do there is a reason and it may be something of relevance to you as well.In seeking to overcome some long standing elbow issues that were beginning to significantly impact my deadlift I was referred to Ido Portal.  Ido has some interesting concepts worth exploring.  One of which is hanging.  This is primarily done for shoulder health, which in my case with the use of the ShouldeRök™ is not necessary.However the tractioning on the elbow from both directions was worth exploring.  I had already been doing static holds with a barbell for the last couple years to work on my grip strength and desensitize my thumb for the hook grip.  With that in mind I wasn’t expecting much from the hangs and was surprised at the difference I found.  In this case I began doing full passive hangs letting everything relax and hang.  Doing so I found that even the grip became more challenging than when just holding on in an active movement such as a pull-up.  With the passive hang everything is stretched from lats, scap, tricpes, biceps, and all the muscle of the lower arm and fingers.I quickly transitioned from doing static holds to doing passive hangs and within a month had switched to one arm hangs.  It wasn’t until the single arm hangs that I began really feeling a difference in my arm.  The extra force as well as the dynamics of the hang put a lot more force and traction on my...

Whiskey & Deadlifts (aka - Powerlifting: Experimentation and Logic behind Intra-Workout Alcohol Consumption) by powerlifter Chris DuffinAre you looking for an excuse to get drunk or abuse alcohol? If yes than go away! This is most definitely not an article for you.  Without a doubt the negative long term and short term effects of alcohol are very well documented. Particularly as an athlete, excess and even moderate alcohol use can have a detrimental effect on your powerlifting and strongman performance. From negative hormonal factors such as lowering testosterone, lowering HGH, lowering ADP generation, and increasing cortisol to dietary impacts of reducing protein syntheses, containing 7cal/g of energy, and interfering with absorption of other nutrients - all of these factors make it clear that alcohol is something to avoid as a strength athlete (or consume in very minimal quantities).  The short term depressant effect, slowing both cognitive ability as well as coordination, and reducing decision making abilities makes it hard to understand how there would be any value in alcohol at all – particularly when it comes to strength sports.Unfortunately for us, much of the research we have access to is incomplete. It looks at the short term and long term effects of alcohol on the body. There is plenty of positive research on minimal to moderate long-term alcohol use and the positive effects on cardiovascular health and free radical scavenging properties – This might be something for us to explore at another time.The exception and interesting thing to note is in the lack of research on the IMMEDIATE effects of low-dose alcohol consumption on the athlete.[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="686"] Why do the snatch balance when you can do the scotch balance?[/caption]The proposed hypothesis is that alcohol used in small and properly timed doses allows for harnessing some of the immediate psychoactive effects...

[wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false" initial_volume="100" disable_keyboard="0"]BQVcrbAhPcA[/wpdevart_youtube] FORETHOUGHTSMy initial goal was to come in and make a run at a 2100+ total for the All-Time record but my primary goal was to win the meet.  I wasn’t planning on making a run for my 2204 (10kg) total at this meet yet as I had not been able to train the deadlift heavy.  This was due to a recent elbow surgery and some bicep tearing when I tried to ramp up the weights to early at 6 weeks out form the meet.  So the last 6 weeks I was letting my bicep and arm fully heal and was hoping on still getting a decent enough pull in for at least the All-time record.It began as a challenging week.  With being unable to sleep on the 20hr flight to Sydney then arriving and getting settled in I ended up going 2.5 days without sleep.  After one fuller, but still incomplete, night of sleep I started my water cut to the 220lb class.  Interestingly I was stuck in a hard place with making this cut.  If I came up a 1lb short I wouldn’t be weighing in at 221 for the meet as the 242lb class was scheduled for the following day so it would leave me having to cut 2 days in a row or just recomping and competing in the 275’s.  So missing by even .2lbs would essentially move me up two weight classes and change the day I competed, and require me to change my flight plans.WEIGHT CUTI ended up having put some weight on this last 8 weeks since my last cut to 220.  While it was only about 5lbs it was 5lbs on top of an...

 Link from my sponsor EliteFTS with videos First week back after the meet over the weekend. Remember it was supposed to just be test meet so no deload after the meet. Well I rarely do anyway. I’m usually ready to train after my deload into a meet, just not with the same level of strength due to condition of the body.MONDAYMace Swings 3x10/side Curls 35 x16,16,16Bench Press 315x23,20Dips BW+180 x8,6,6Overhead Press (Machine) Stack x16,16,16WEDNESDAYSumo Deadlift off 3” blocksSquats 155x5 265x3 375x3 485x2 595x1 705x2,2 with a nice pop in my bicep on second repPause Squats w/5 seconds in hole 425x5,51 arm dead hangs 2-3 sets per side @ 10-20sec eachTHURSDAYCircuit Training BW Dips x 65,65,65 Leg Extensions – Stack x20,20,20 Leg Curls – 3/4stack x20,20,20 Mace Swings x20,20,20,20 ...

I get to work with some damn strong, damn good people. This is a post from the team at EliteFTS focused on me and fellow team member Chris Janek recapping our recent successes. Enjoy!"Knocking out multiple international accolades in one weekend, Chris Duffin and Chris Janek made it clear why they belong with elitefts™. Janek, the newest equipped lifter of the team, won a world title at the GPC World Powerlifting Championships in Argentina. Duffin set a new all-time world record squat for the 220-pound weight class, breaking his own previous record. He now holds the heaviest-ever four-times bodyweight squat, at 881 pounds. (more...