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Derrington Wright is a strength coach at Kabuki Strength and an elite powerlifter in the USAPL/IPF. He may be reached with comments and questions at [email protected] Staying in the same vein of my last article I’ll be giving you some tips on things you could be doing to make your setup in the squat more efficient.There is a lack of attention that is paid to how people bring the bar out of the rack. I am no exception to that and I used to be the same way.My squat form has always been decent, but I’ve never paid a lot of attention to my squat-unrack. Then I came across the quote, “If it starts badly it’s probably going to end worse”. Then it clicked; if my setup is bad my squat is likely going to be bad too (or at least not as strong and efficient as it could be). I knew the importance of breathing, bracing, foot placement etc. during the actual movement, but when it came to unracking the bar, my only thought was to get the bar out of the rack without dying. Hopefully, I can save some of you from making the same mistakes I have.Below I’m going to note a few things that I don’t think lifters focus enough on when unracking the bar: 1. Making sure the bar is set over mid foot- When people have their feet too far back, their weight tends to shift forward and over their toes. Conversely, when their feet are too far forward their weight tends to shift towards their heels. Both of these things, while seemingly subtle, and may not make you fall on your face when unracking or fall back onto the ground, will lead to unnecessary energy leakage as you are trying to stabilize yourself afterward. 2. Setting...

Brady Cable is a Coach and Operations Manager at Kabuki Strength. To read more about Virtual Coaching services click the coaching link in the menu or click here. For more content like this and hundreds of indexed videos on movement, cueing, technique, lectures, and other educational topics please visit kabuki.ms. Whether you’ve been following our content for years or you’re just starting to dive in, you’ve likely noticed we start many of our corrective strategies with bracing and spinal mechanics. We don’t do this to over simplify the process but, because so often the dysfunction or issue in question is driven by poor spinal mechanics. Bracing is a logical place to go for people with back pain or other issues directly related to their spine, but it’ll also explain some ways in which spinal mechanics influence the mechanics of distal joints, like hips and shoulders.It’s worth outlining what we’re even talking about with regards to either bracing or spinal mechanics and put some context to it.  In many cases, this article will be directed towards powerlifters or other sagittal plane athletes but can applied broadly to other types of athletes as well depending on the situation. Positional Changes Why we feel bracing is so important begins with a discussion about spinal mechanics. It’s not news that you want to minimize changes in spinal position during most axial loaded movements especially from a safety standpoint. I don’t think there’s anyone out there that thinks you should egregiously round your spine throughout the course of a pull to be a better deadlifter. There are nuanced discussions where people make arguments for starting in a bit more flexion particularly in the thoracic spine, but there’s always the caveat of “if it stays locked”. I used the example of flexion, but this applies to spinal extension too....

Conventions, different gyms, flying, driving, funerals, and yes some training as well.  I was able to get all my work in for the week which was quite challenging considering the activities for the week.  But that is how living should be done.  Met some great people, saw sights, and spent quality time with good friends.  Even got some heavy squats in which was not expected nor in the plan of the week either.Click the image below to see the full details of my training as well as the planning approach we use for myself and all our coached athleteshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FImJtlzVNQw...

Its certainly easy to let circumstances get in the way of training.  This las week I was out of town for the first half of the week and then had my kids with me at work the remainder of the week.  Despite the travel and trying to stay caught up on my busy work schedule and entertain the kids I got everything worked in for the most part.Click the image below to see the full details of my training as well as the planning approach we use for myself and all our coached athletes.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dvsHLr5LtE...

This last week marks the first full week of pretty consistent training.  Feeling like I'm finding my groove again with the growing responsibility of expanding Kabuki Strength, personal changes in life, and getting back on training post injury.  Last week I updated my rehab process and now we begin regular updates on training again.Click the image below to see the full details of my training as well as the planning approach we use for myself and all our coached athletes.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xDPr2F1nV8 ...

Recent discussion on where I'm at with training and rehab since my freak accident in May result in multiple muscle tears.  The worst of which was grade 3 tears of the Hamstring Bicep Femorus and the Peronus following a bout of walking Pneumonia.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZG2EVF9IxEI...

In the following video I discuss leverages and deadlifting.  A lot of people assume if there is less apparent bar movement that the lifter has some phenomenal leverages allowing them to lift the bar less.  Oftentimes this appearance is a result of refined technique and not leverages.  This is not always the case but simple math of looking at height and the ape index would let you know.  Being that I am both average height with perfectly average ape index, and with refined technique I am a good example to use.  In the video and discussion I review these points and also overlay two videos.   It shows one of those people that wants to blame their poor technique and how much others lift on leverages.  Focusing on excuses instead of their own technique is leaving performance potential on the table for them.  As well as putting them at significant risk for injury.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7ByAV1ywDv8 ...

Without a specific plan for training for the week, not wanting to hit any volume because of the cold, and feeling I left some weight on the platform in the cage I pushed the weights heavier than I should have.  While volume was low this week it was quite a demanding week (or two in actuality) that will require me to take it much easier this coming week.  Looking at going into a high frequency deadlift routine on conventional deadlifts starting soon however.  This will be interesting as I have not specifically trained conventional deadlifts for at least a decade and never done them with high frequency.  All in prep for an event coming this fall.  Should be interesting.  ...

Below is a short video that we put together at the Arnold really quick right after the event.  A longer, higher quality one, will be going up later next week I believe.  But first is a lengthy video detailing my experience as well as some of the challenges I faced coming down with a cold heading into this.  As well as regrets...