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This piece was written by Kabuki Strength Co-Owner and Chief Engineer Chris Duffin, a world-renowned coach and strength athlete who has had his fair share of hamstring injuries during his long career. Kabuki Strength is an organization devoted to optimizing human performance via innovative equipment, education, and coaching services. Kabuki.MS is a subscription movement library containing hundreds of educational videos like the ones you see below.  While this piece is specifically around hamstring strain recovery the concepts can be applied across a number of similar soft tissue injuries.  Also understand its important to seek a qualified professionals assessment.  As the following content is not intended to be taken as medical advice but more simply as a sample training plan during the recovery process.As a resource here are some provider searches that I can recommend.http://www.rehab2performance.comhttp://www.clinicalathlete.comhttp://movementproviders.comOutside of direct accident nearly all muscle strains or tears can be traced to two issues.  Either training levels were accumulating fatigue at a higher rate than adaptation or recovery, or there were faulty movement patterns.  Typically the first of those two is the reason and referencing Tim Gabbet’s work is often accompanied with weekly increases in volume above 10-15%.  However in my in experience the latter often comes into play when dealing with hamstring issues as this large muscle group is quick to come into play in regards to compensating for other muscles around the hip. STEP 1 – Rest During Acute Phase As we move into the recovery process which usually will begin following the first 3-4 days of more acute inflation following the initial injury it is important to understand these concepts and a few others.Training itself, or moving, is essential in the healing process.  It is not just blood flow but the release of growth factors and reactions at the cellular level.  These are the same...

Week 3 is in the books and everything is feeling good, started an ice bath protocol for 20 minutes 1x every other week to speed up recovery and i am in the process of trying to find a good ART guy to go see once per month. I need to stay on top of my recovery during this time because the volume is being pushed high and I want to take training to 6-7 week phases before deloading. As for diet and dropping to the 220lbs weight class, its not exactly going as planned. Not that I am not staying on track with the food my body is just absorbing it during this hypertrophy phase and I am growing. Like I've said before i am not going to force a weight class, i want to be as strong as humanly possible and I will not let a weight class dictate my total. So I will keep riding out this mini diet for a few more weeks and see what happens. At the end of this time i will either keep pushing to try and get to 230lbs or I will push the scale up to 250-255lbs. I am waking up at 237-240lbs depending on the day. [wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false" initial_volume="100" disable_keyboard="0"]-yBvAFvMfUM[/wpdevart_youtube]Here is a recap of this weeks training:MondaySSB Squats- 4x8- Up 20lbs from week 2 and moved fasterSumo Pulls- 4x6- Up 44lbs from week 2Belt Squats- 4x10Leg Extension and Curls- 3x12Ab Wheel- 3x10 [wpdevart_youtube width="640" height="385" autoplay="0" theme="dark" loop_video="0" enable_fullscreen="1" show_related="1" show_popup="0" thumb_popup_width="213" thumb_popup_height="128" show_title="1" show_youtube_icon="1" show_annotations="1" show_progress_bar_color="red" autohide_parameters="1" set_initial_volume="false" initial_volume="100" disable_keyboard="0"]pKgKQSHXurE[/wpdevart_youtube]WednesdayCG BP- 5x7-8- Added 20lbs from week 2Swiss Bar BP- 3x AMRAP with 225lbsJM Press- 5x10-12Dips- 4x12-15s/sLat Pulldowns- 4x12DB Tate Presses- 4x12s/sPreacher Curls- 4x20s/sBanded Abs- 4x15 Friday2" Block...

Injury Prevention, Wisdom, Longevity - You're Not as Broken as You Think You AreChris Duffin is a dominant force in both raw and multi-ply lifting, He currently held the all-time raw (with wraps) world record with a 881-pound squat at 220-pounds bodyweight. In 2014, he posted a raw total of 2061 pounds in the 220-pound class. In addition to his own competitive success, he has been the owner and coach of Kabuki Strength in Portland, Oregon since 2008. Chris Duffin holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from The Oregon Institute of Technology and an MBA from The University of Phoenix. Duffin approaches powerlifting at a level of technical efficiency that is unsurpassed. His insight into training has helped many of his students go on to success beyond their expectations.My wife is convinced that it is my goal to break something when I go extreme rock crawling and off-roading. While she isn’t right, she isn’t entirely wrong.A big piece of the rock crawling/off-roading sport for me is trying to anticipate every failure point and then find a way to make it unbreakable. The goal is to make it out unscathed, but you never find out if you succeeded or what you overlooked unless you push past the limits. Training isn’t much different. The exception is that you try to stay within the limits or you risk actually breaking your body. It is the same that we try to anticipate failure points and build an unbreakable machine of a body.You constantly analyze your body’s strengths, weaknesses, imbalances, and technical flaws, then develop a strategic game plan to address them. This plan is tested at a meet or in the gym testing a new PR. Good lifters gather more information from these testing experiences and go back to the drawing board to begin anew and...