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Kyle Young is a strength athlete, clinician, and coach at Kabuki Strength. To learn more about Kyle, you can read his bio here. To work with Kyle and our coaching staff, please head over to our coaching page and signup for a free strategy call with a coach, or signup for coaching directly.Listen up--if you have never been in a powerlifting meet but want to, or if you are about to compete in your first--if you have competed, give this top 10 a quick read and see if passing it along can help someone you know.I have competed in a lot of meets over the last 8 years, in a lot of different federations- raw, single ply, and mulit ply. From local to national and, world level meets across the country. Over this time, I have helped, handled, and coached some amazing athletes along with many entry level lifters. Beyond all of this I have dedicated hours upon hours spotting, loading, and running the platform.Why do I bring all this up? I have had the opportunity over the years to gain 3 unique prospectives to provide the advice below. I wish someone would have bestowed some of this info upon me before any of my first meets.As a coach, athlete and spotter/ loader I have seen a lot of cool things and many things that could of went better for the lifter. Now remember before we proceed to the cool stuff. This is not all you should know before showing up. No, I will not give you all of my secretes you have to pay for that!!! However, I have gained a lot of free knowledge over the years and love to give back, so I hope this helps. Please know the rules, lifting commands and if your equipment is...

Brady Cable is a Coach and Operations Manager at Kabuki Strength. His personal best deadlift is 765lbs in the 93 kilo weight class. And yes, pulled with a hook grip. If you are interested in working with our coaches, please visit our coaching site. Grip in the deadlift is an issue that not everyone has a problem with. Something that those who do struggle with grip loss know it to be all too frustrating. Someone once said to me “if you haven’t had a grip problem, you might just not be strong enough to have a grip problem yet”. People who often use straps for much of their training find their grip might become the limiting factor in their competition deadlift over other parts of their body. One of the most disappointing things in powerlifting is locking out a big PR deadlift, especially on the platform, and then dropping it near or at lockout. Knowing your body had all the strength required to lift the weight, but your hands did not. Between this and a growing fear or possibly awareness of the possibility of bicep tears, using a double overhand hook grip is something that’s becoming increasingly popular within the sport. I don’t think hook grip is the only solution to grip problems, or even a solution at all for some people. This article will be a comprehensive guide to learning and working up to using hook grip but will also be riddled with general grip advice that will be applicable to any style and may just make you a better at the deadlift.I’ve had quite a few clients and acquaintances approach me about the grip in their deadlift in the last few years and I generally see at least one of three things that can be improved regardless of using...

Ben Pollack is one of this generation’s greatest lifters and geniuses, a physical culture expert, world record holder and US Open powerlifting champion. Know as “PhDeadlift” on social media, Ben is currently wrapping up his PhD and is one of the most educated and insightful competitors to grace the platform. Check out his site at phdeadlift.com.Confession time: I’m a preworkout junkie.  The adrenaline rush from lifting alone is great, but combine that with a boatload of caffeine and every other stimulant under the sun, and even light training days can feel more exciting.  Plus, all that extra energy obviously has a performance-enhancing effect, as well.Or does it?In reality, as fun and useful as stimulants can be for lifting, they can be really detrimental, too — especially if you tend to rely on them too much, or find that you can’t lift well without them.  The problem is compounded by most of the preworkout products on the market, which are loaded not only with caffeine, but also with a bunch of other new-wave stimulating compounds that can enhance both the benefits and drawbacks of more common pick-me-ups like caffeine.Dave Tate has explained why preworkouts don’t work for him, and I strongly suggest you take a look at his thoughts on the matter.  Chris Duffin and Chad Wesley Smith agree.  And I also suggest that, if you’re using lots of stimulants, that you pay careful attention to a few particular areas of your training: Regulating EffortOne of the most important parts of making long-term progress involves learning to regulate your effort when you train.  On some days, or at certain times during a training cycle, you’ll want to push yourself close to your limits, in order to create the necessary stimulus to build strength and muscle.  At other times, you’ll want to train less intensely...

Ben Pollack is one of this generation’s greatest lifters and geniuses, a physical culture expert, world record holder and US Open powerlifting champion. Know as “PhDeadlift” on social media, Ben is currently wrapping up his PhD and is one of the most educated and insightful competitors to grace the platform. Check out his site at phdeadlift.com. I was lucky enough to get the chance to chat with Chris Duffin about training recently.  It was a great conversation because we both have a similar mental approach to training: if we’re going to make it worthwhile, we need to go into the gym with a very concrete goal in mind.  And the more frequently we do that, the better.  While light days have their place in any sound training program, they’re just not fun.But as Chris pointed out, training doesn’t always have to be fun.  He put it really simply: training is your job.  I love that analogy, because I think it captures the essence of what makes a successful program and a successful lifter.  In the rest of this article, and in the video below, I’ll go into more detail about what that means, and how you can apply it to your own plan. Staying Consistent Consistency is the name of the game when it comes to strength, and just like you can’t skip work because you’re “not feeling it,” you can’t skip training without a good reason, either.  Of course, just like you might take the occasional sick day from work when you have the flu, there are legitimate reasons to pass on the gym.  If you’re sick, injured, or you have a really significant life event that precludes you from following your plan, you’re not going to help yourself by trying somehow to train anyway.But for the most part, you should take steps to...

This piece was written by Kabuki Strength Co-Owner and Chief Engineer Chris Duffin, a world-renowned coach and strength athlete who has had his fair share of hamstring injuries during his long career. Kabuki Strength is an organization devoted to optimizing human performance via innovative equipment, education, and coaching services. Kabuki.MS is a subscription movement library containing hundreds of educational videos like the ones you see below.  While this piece is specifically around hamstring strain recovery the concepts can be applied across a number of similar soft tissue injuries.  Also understand its important to seek a qualified professionals assessment.  As the following content is not intended to be taken as medical advice but more simply as a sample training plan during the recovery process.As a resource here are some provider searches that I can recommend.http://www.rehab2performance.comhttp://www.clinicalathlete.comhttp://movementproviders.comOutside of direct accident nearly all muscle strains or tears can be traced to two issues.  Either training levels were accumulating fatigue at a higher rate than adaptation or recovery, or there were faulty movement patterns.  Typically the first of those two is the reason and referencing Tim Gabbet’s work is often accompanied with weekly increases in volume above 10-15%.  However in my in experience the latter often comes into play when dealing with hamstring issues as this large muscle group is quick to come into play in regards to compensating for other muscles around the hip. STEP 1 – Rest During Acute Phase As we move into the recovery process which usually will begin following the first 3-4 days of more acute inflation following the initial injury it is important to understand these concepts and a few others.Training itself, or moving, is essential in the healing process.  It is not just blood flow but the release of growth factors and reactions at the cellular level.  These are the same...

Conventions, different gyms, flying, driving, funerals, and yes some training as well.  I was able to get all my work in for the week which was quite challenging considering the activities for the week.  But that is how living should be done.  Met some great people, saw sights, and spent quality time with good friends.  Even got some heavy squats in which was not expected nor in the plan of the week either.Click the image below to see the full details of my training as well as the planning approach we use for myself and all our coached athleteshttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FImJtlzVNQw...

Its certainly easy to let circumstances get in the way of training.  This las week I was out of town for the first half of the week and then had my kids with me at work the remainder of the week.  Despite the travel and trying to stay caught up on my busy work schedule and entertain the kids I got everything worked in for the most part.Click the image below to see the full details of my training as well as the planning approach we use for myself and all our coached athletes.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6dvsHLr5LtE...

This last week marks the first full week of pretty consistent training.  Feeling like I'm finding my groove again with the growing responsibility of expanding Kabuki Strength, personal changes in life, and getting back on training post injury.  Last week I updated my rehab process and now we begin regular updates on training again.Click the image below to see the full details of my training as well as the planning approach we use for myself and all our coached athletes.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1xDPr2F1nV8 ...

Recent discussion on where I'm at with training and rehab since my freak accident in May result in multiple muscle tears.  The worst of which was grade 3 tears of the Hamstring Bicep Femorus and the Peronus following a bout of walking Pneumonia.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZG2EVF9IxEI...