Kabuki Strength
Start your search here for content on our site
Search here:
  • All
  • Articles
  • Athlete
  • blog
  • Chris' Training
  • Equipment
  • Events
  • KMS Private Library
  • KMS Public
  • News
  • Podcasts
  • Sports
  • Strength Chat
  • Uncategorized
  • Virtual Athlete Profiles

Brady Cable is a Coach and Operations Manager at Kabuki Strength. To read more about Virtual Coaching services click the coaching link in the menu or click here. For more content like this and hundreds of indexed videos on movement, cueing, technique, lectures, and other educational topics please visit kabuki.ms. Whether you’ve been following our content for years or you’re just starting to dive in, you’ve likely noticed we start many of our corrective strategies with bracing and spinal mechanics. We don’t do this to over simplify the process but, because so often the dysfunction or issue in question is driven by poor spinal mechanics. Bracing is a logical place to go for people with back pain or other issues directly related to their spine, but it’ll also explain some ways in which spinal mechanics influence the mechanics of distal joints, like hips and shoulders.It’s worth outlining what we’re even talking about with regards to either bracing or spinal mechanics and put some context to it.  In many cases, this article will be directed towards powerlifters or other sagittal plane athletes but can applied broadly to other types of athletes as well depending on the situation. Positional Changes Why we feel bracing is so important begins with a discussion about spinal mechanics. It’s not news that you want to minimize changes in spinal position during most axial loaded movements especially from a safety standpoint. I don’t think there’s anyone out there that thinks you should egregiously round your spine throughout the course of a pull to be a better deadlifter. There are nuanced discussions where people make arguments for starting in a bit more flexion particularly in the thoracic spine, but there’s always the caveat of “if it stays locked”. I used the example of flexion, but this applies to spinal extension too....

The Macebell or Gada is a classical training tool dating back centuries.  Its original use was in the wrestling for fighting cultures of ancient Persia and India.  My first experience using one was about 8 years ago when I attempted to incorporate it for shoulder development and conditioning. As a competitive powerlifter I quickly abandoned its use finding that combined with my powerlifting training it aggravated my wrist, elbows, and shoulders.However 2 years ago I decided to make another run at using the macebell again.  I had been making tremendous gains in shoulder health and mobility with my progression into Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) and some associated kettlebell work.  I decided to try the swing again but focus on some refinement in the movement based on the DNS methodologies.  The goal was to simply realize some training efficiency as the swing was a very active warmup.  If I could accomplish my rehab, prehab, and warmup all at the same time I would have more time to focus on my actual training.With the new approach to the swing my shoulder pain that I had been experiencing daily for the last 8 years disappeared after the first 30 days.  This is pain that had kept me from sleeping, interfered with my training, and I was only able to manage in the short term with mobilizing and re-seating drills.  Gone!  I couldn’t believe the change.  Being surrounded by powerlifters and strongman I found several other test subjects similar to myself and quickly found that the same thing happened. That was when I decided to develop the tool into what we now are marketing to others as the ShouldeRök™.  For further details on the value of the ShouldeRök™ and its impact on eliminating issues caused by open chain barbell movements today done with an...

Last weekend I took a trip to Las Vegas and worked with my friend Stan Efferding (Worlds Strongest Bodybuilder) and also Eric Spoto (worlds strongest raw bench presser).  I have been working with Eric Spoto on his rotator cuff surgery rehab plan over the last several months.  Eric has been working with his physical therapist on his rehab plan while I was guiding him on his training in the gym and other recuperative movements that fell within those parameters.   With Eric's progress he had reached a point that we could begin incorporating the ShouldeRok to deal with some of the root issues that could have led to his surgery to begin with.  It was time to build the platform for ongoing strength and shoulder health for his continued dominance in the bench press, prompting this trip.Upon learning that I was coming down I received a text from Stan asking if I could help him dial in some changes to his deadlift.  At least the text was sent to my phone, but I was confused as he was referencing the "mad scientist" for assistance.  Upon arriving at the Iron House gym Stan cleared up that he was indeed talking about me, as you will see in the following video.  Upon reflection the nickname is fitting given my tendency to tinker with and improve everything including my machining, 4 wheeling rigs, gym devices, and human movement.Don't worry the actual coaching videos will follow in coming weeks: "The Mad Scientist of Powerlifting"? Stan Efferding w/Chris Duffin...

This series on squatting has been about maintaining proper spine positon and bracing during the movement. It has had a specific focus on the often overlooked importance of eliminating thoracic spine extension. To date, we have covered how to create the stability to brace the spine and generate deep spinal stabilization. This starts with the process of creating the correct intra-abdominal pressurization. The second piece in this series covered what you can do to determine the correct hand position based on your current shoulder mobility, and then you use that hand position to improve your squat through incorporation of the lats. In this final piece of the series I will discuss some of the science behind the approach I have been outlining....