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Derrington Wright is a strength coach at Kabuki Strength and an elite powerlifter in the USAPL/IPF. He may be reached with comments and questions at [email protected] Staying in the same vein of my last article I’ll be giving you some tips on things you could be doing to make your setup in the squat more efficient.There is a lack of attention that is paid to how people bring the bar out of the rack. I am no exception to that and I used to be the same way.My squat form has always been decent, but I’ve never paid a lot of attention to my squat-unrack. Then I came across the quote, “If it starts badly it’s probably going to end worse”. Then it clicked; if my setup is bad my squat is likely going to be bad too (or at least not as strong and efficient as it could be). I knew the importance of breathing, bracing, foot placement etc. during the actual movement, but when it came to unracking the bar, my only thought was to get the bar out of the rack without dying. Hopefully, I can save some of you from making the same mistakes I have.Below I’m going to note a few things that I don’t think lifters focus enough on when unracking the bar: 1. Making sure the bar is set over mid foot- When people have their feet too far back, their weight tends to shift forward and over their toes. Conversely, when their feet are too far forward their weight tends to shift towards their heels. Both of these things, while seemingly subtle, and may not make you fall on your face when unracking or fall back onto the ground, will lead to unnecessary energy leakage as you are trying to stabilize yourself afterward. 2. Setting...

Here is this last weeks training.  A lot more missed training as you will see in my training log snapshot than I would like to see.  But its hard to keep up when traveling and speaking for sure!  Considering that I'm quite happy with the work I did get in however.  Things are progressing nicely.  Will be working on improving the formatting for the training log for those not familiar with how we track training.  But below is the weekly plan, performance, and deviation....

This path may be a little confusing to most.  But I'm taking some time off from heavy lifting right now and making sure I'm functioning well and setup to perform well to hit my 1000lb Squat goal.  While I do this I have an interim goal to do a one-arm barbell snatch of 225lbs.  I might not hit this at this point but its a good time to work on that as a slowly transition back into squat training....

Welcome to the Kabuki Movement System!Before we get into the specifics of what KMS is, here's what a membership on this site will provide you with:Access to KMS video library containing over 100+ videos (more being added weekly)  Guided tutorials created by KMS coaches, outlining proper movement progression and common programming solutions Discussions and access to KMS coaches (Chris Duffin and Co.) via comments on individual videos or the forum KMS programming outlines and sample programs to help you in creating your own programs  Private video content with some of the most recognizable names in the industry - discussing relevant topics​So then, all that being said...

As a performance guy, I absolutely hate the ‘traction control’ button that they put in a number of vehicles today. If you aren't aware of what this button does, it operates by detuning the engine and, in some cases, the transmission. By retarding the engine timing to reduce its output and slowing the shift patterns, it effectively improves the traction but really no more than if you purposely stepped on the gas pedal a little softer and with better control. With less power, the detuned powertrain has less chance of losing control on an unstable surface and causing you to crash and injure yourself.Your body has the exact same mechanisms in place. When you lack stability, your body detunes its reaction to prevent you from injuring yourself. This is the primary reason why training with a Bosu ball or squatting in squishy tennis shoes is counterproductive. With a detuned body, you simply can’t work as hard as you want to or fire and engage your muscles properly. It's also the reason why my coaching cues help people realize immediate improvements in their lifts when implemented properly.If you don’t have a properly stabilized core with proper intra-abdominal pressurization (IAP), this down-regulation is in place. Your traction control button is on. Another button is proper joint centration. If your positioning or tight muscles are pulling the joint to one side of the socket, it will down-regulate your central nervous system firing as well. In practice, this looks like a movement pattern-based, warm-up drill. I have several examples on my YouTube channel and further examples will be covered in depth in the  Duffin Movement Series (DMS).If you're training squats, you would do some movements that require transferring power through the hip joint with a stabilized core. You would do these with proper IAP as a warm...

 I have recently decided to exit my career of 18 years advancing from engineering to executive level leadership the last 8 years.  This move has been in the works a long time but its taken a lot of work to be prepared for the transition. It is a scary move leaving the comfort of a career I have excelled at and am known for my success. However I’ve reached a point in my life that I need to follow my passion and my dreams full time. I now have the opportunity to spend more time collaborating, learning, distilling, and sharing that knowledge.My goal is to add value while continuously improving my relationship with the Strength and Conditioning Community by providing proprietary tools and knowledge designed to optimize physical and psychological human potential.I am excited about that and making this change is worthy of an epic party to celebrate.Of course my idea of a party is different than what most people would imagine. So before engaging in beer, booze, and food I’m going to push myself to my physical and mental limits while attempting to set records.I’m going to be doing a 500lb squat for reps challenge. If I hit 19 reps in 60 seconds it will break the Guinness World record for best squat in a minute. If I hit 24 reps it beats an unlisted record form the 80’s when Tom Platz and Fred Hatfield went head to head for reps with 500lbs.This will be done walked out and with only knee sleeves and belt.Here is the link and embedded page for the live stream event!!! Please share this post around!May 6th @ 3:30 pm PST https://youtu.be/uONcEvbIwfI  https://youtu.be/uONcEvbIwfIIn the interim here is a video to get you pumped up about the event.https://youtu.be/yZIq1tFIKUg...

Last week I took a trip to visit my friend Mark Bell at his new facility.  We had a great time shooting interviews, podcast, and some great instructional pieces I did with some of his athletes.  I'm looking forward to these pieces coming available on the public domain for you to see in the coming weeks.On the last day before catching a flight out of town we decided to do a quick Q&A from the social media following and posted up request to questions just before the final workout of the visit.  Unfortunately there were so many questions that came in we were barely able to get to a fraction of them, but hope that you enjoy the ones we were able to get to.Additionally here is the workout video for last week which covers the time at SuperTraining.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aCosKMJ6Sa0...

This weekend I had the opportunity to spend a couple full days working with Ed Coan.  We had a great deal of success in working through some issues he has and establishing a path forward.  During the time we also had a lot of back and forth knowledge sharing.It was a tremendous honor for me to host Ed for the weekend at EPC in Portland and to have his trust for seeking me out.  At the end of the period we filmed an incredible interview covering a number of great topics that I think are worth the watch. Make sure to check out the ShouldeRök™ Ed mentioned and subscribe to our newsletter for weekly insights....

In December of 2012 I tore my right adductor in a meet.  I had actually had some minor tearing early in the year and had been managing it to keep training but with a 782 competition squat it let go on me.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YoEJMEFJAYI After rehabbing the area I determined a need to reduce my injury risk.  With squatting wide and pulling sumo it simply puts a lot of strain on this area that is sometimes slow to recover.  It is also a faily common injury point with lifters.One of the ways I have reduced this risk is with ensuring proper recruitment patterns are firing before this heavy eccentric load.  This is done with a specific warmup routine and test-retest methodology before jumping under squats.  I reviewed this warmup routine on Breaking Muscle.That write up only covered that specific warmup and also skipped the hip-airplane that I often employ as part of it.In this video piece I go into depth on the hip-aiprlane that is used before I squat and pull but also passive compression and some targeted volume work.  The passive compression can make an instantaneous improvement if you have some issues in this area and also seems to improve recovery as well as reduce injury risk.  I employ passive compression in training on pretty much every heavy set for this reason.  A hammy band or a compression band work great.  In addition to the passive compression it’s great to work in some volume work to stimulate flushing of this low blood flow area.  An example of this is provided in the video as well.This is not the be all and end all of groin health, but just the methods I have employed with success.   It has allowed me to successfully move from that failed squat at the beginning to the standing...