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Feeling pretty solid this week.  The trick now will be to not push it to hard or to fast and move backwards on the progress to date.  But as you can see I'm just about 100% back in action now.  This week was originally planned as a deload week but due to the the lower training while rehabbing it was changed to a transition week.  Loads remained higher the first half of the week then tapered a bit in preparation for the next week.Click the image below to see the full details of my training as well as the planning approach we use.https://youtu.be/RrgDEekptMI...

The quad rehab is coming along quite well and I was able to push things pretty hard this last week.  Not as hard as I would have liked but that would have meant no injury to begin with.  But there is not a better point I could be sitting at right now than where I am at given the recent injury.  Click the image below to see the full details over everything that has gone on in my training this week and to see how we approach the planning process.https://youtu.be/ZPEppndio8Y...

Well this week didn't go as planned starting out with an injury on an already short prep cycle.  But all you can do is go with the new flow and develop a plan of action and execute.  Here I show some of the work thats been done over the course of the week.  Below is also the training log with all details on what was done during the course of the week. https://youtu.be/oxM5TxcVLcg...

Feeling a lot more stable with my squats this last week.  Was also quite happy with all my big lifts for the week given I'm just getting back into hitting all 3 major lifts in the same week again.  I'm squatting twice, benching once, and deadlifting once, with one two accessory back days.  I still have a little bit of an issue with nagging oblique and QL strain on the left side which is likely due to the last training cycle but it is recovering quite well.  Prep time for Arnold Fit Expo is quite short but overall I'm walking around stronger than I have ever been before so I don't think I'll need to be reliant on a huge prep period.  The details of the training plan are below.https://youtu.be/2WgIkyebHd4...

Still keeping it under wraps as to exactly what I want to do in the Animal Cage at the Arnold.  But I am excited for it.  This marks the first week of training for a very short prep period.  It will also delay my 1000lb squat goal but I've got a pretty interesting plan for the year for my goals.  Ready to get moving forward on it.Below is the training plan for the week. ...

Both powerlifting and strongman often offer 18-24hr weigh-ins prior to the start of the meet. This creates an opportunity for you to plan and manage your weight class with some different objectives that can’t be realized than when faced with a 2hr weigh-in. You may wonder why would one put off cutting weight to the last minute, instead of having the discipline to slowly diet down to the desired weight class. The answer is simple: performance. Properly managing your weight ABOVE your weight class can actually improve your performance on meet day. In this short piece I’ll detail the approach I take with lifters I coach.In the slowly-dieting-down-to-a weight-class approach there are some negatives that come into play. Let’s take an athlete that’s 10-12lbs over their weight class. At two months out from competition this lifter will begin diet restrictions and slowly get down to their weight class for the meet. Unfortunately this will leave you training at a weight higher than you will be on meet day for majority of your training cycle. Of particular importance is the last 1-4 weeks when you’re finally getting close to your weight class, which also intersects with the timing for deloading and handling submaximal weights. These two factors combined give you a false sense of strength and don’t allow you to learn the impact of leverage changes due to the weight loss.   During the heavy training completed at one month out from competition you’re still quite a bit heavier than you will be on meet day. Additionally, as you actually get close to target weight in the last few weeks, you’re not handling heavy lifts anymore and don’t learn the balance and leverage changes at your meet day bodyweight. This approach may lead to underperforming or setting expectations too high.Another important aspect...

Whiskey & Deadlifts (aka - Powerlifting: Experimentation and Logic behind Intra-Workout Alcohol Consumption) by powerlifter Chris DuffinAre you looking for an excuse to get drunk or abuse alcohol? If yes than go away! This is most definitely not an article for you.  Without a doubt the negative long term and short term effects of alcohol are very well documented. Particularly as an athlete, excess and even moderate alcohol use can have a detrimental effect on your powerlifting and strongman performance. From negative hormonal factors such as lowering testosterone, lowering HGH, lowering ADP generation, and increasing cortisol to dietary impacts of reducing protein syntheses, containing 7cal/g of energy, and interfering with absorption of other nutrients - all of these factors make it clear that alcohol is something to avoid as a strength athlete (or consume in very minimal quantities).  The short term depressant effect, slowing both cognitive ability as well as coordination, and reducing decision making abilities makes it hard to understand how there would be any value in alcohol at all – particularly when it comes to strength sports.Unfortunately for us, much of the research we have access to is incomplete. It looks at the short term and long term effects of alcohol on the body. There is plenty of positive research on minimal to moderate long-term alcohol use and the positive effects on cardiovascular health and free radical scavenging properties – This might be something for us to explore at another time.The exception and interesting thing to note is in the lack of research on the IMMEDIATE effects of low-dose alcohol consumption on the athlete.[caption id="" align="aligncenter" width="686"] Why do the snatch balance when you can do the scotch balance?[/caption]The proposed hypothesis is that alcohol used in small and properly timed doses allows for harnessing some of the immediate psychoactive effects...